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Theorem List for Intuitionistic Logic Explorer - 8501-8600   *Has distinct variable group(s)
TypeLabelDescription
Statement
 
Theorem7p4e11 8501 7 + 4 = 11. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.) (Revised by AV, 6-Sep-2021.)
(7 + 4) = 11
 
Theorem7p5e12 8502 7 + 5 = 12. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(7 + 5) = 12
 
Theorem7p6e13 8503 7 + 6 = 13. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(7 + 6) = 13
 
Theorem7p7e14 8504 7 + 7 = 14. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(7 + 7) = 14
 
Theorem8p2e10 8505 8 + 2 = 10. (Contributed by NM, 5-Feb-2007.) (Revised by Stanislas Polu, 7-Apr-2020.) (Revised by AV, 6-Sep-2021.)
(8 + 2) = 10
 
Theorem8p3e11 8506 8 + 3 = 11. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.) (Revised by AV, 6-Sep-2021.)
(8 + 3) = 11
 
Theorem8p4e12 8507 8 + 4 = 12. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(8 + 4) = 12
 
Theorem8p5e13 8508 8 + 5 = 13. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(8 + 5) = 13
 
Theorem8p6e14 8509 8 + 6 = 14. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(8 + 6) = 14
 
Theorem8p7e15 8510 8 + 7 = 15. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(8 + 7) = 15
 
Theorem8p8e16 8511 8 + 8 = 16. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(8 + 8) = 16
 
Theorem9p2e11 8512 9 + 2 = 11. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.) (Revised by AV, 6-Sep-2021.)
(9 + 2) = 11
 
Theorem9p3e12 8513 9 + 3 = 12. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(9 + 3) = 12
 
Theorem9p4e13 8514 9 + 4 = 13. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(9 + 4) = 13
 
Theorem9p5e14 8515 9 + 5 = 14. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(9 + 5) = 14
 
Theorem9p6e15 8516 9 + 6 = 15. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(9 + 6) = 15
 
Theorem9p7e16 8517 9 + 7 = 16. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(9 + 7) = 16
 
Theorem9p8e17 8518 9 + 8 = 17. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(9 + 8) = 17
 
Theorem9p9e18 8519 9 + 9 = 18. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(9 + 9) = 18
 
Theorem10p10e20 8520 10 + 10 = 20. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.) (Revised by AV, 6-Sep-2021.)
(10 + 10) = 20
 
Theorem10m1e9 8521 10 - 1 = 9. (Contributed by AV, 6-Sep-2021.)
(10 − 1) = 9
 
Theorem4t3lem 8522 Lemma for 4t3e12 8523 and related theorems. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
𝐴 ∈ ℕ0    &   𝐵 ∈ ℕ0    &   𝐶 = (𝐵 + 1)    &   (𝐴 · 𝐵) = 𝐷    &   (𝐷 + 𝐴) = 𝐸       (𝐴 · 𝐶) = 𝐸
 
Theorem4t3e12 8523 4 times 3 equals 12. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(4 · 3) = 12
 
Theorem4t4e16 8524 4 times 4 equals 16. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(4 · 4) = 16
 
Theorem5t2e10 8525 5 times 2 equals 10. (Contributed by NM, 5-Feb-2007.) (Revised by AV, 4-Sep-2021.)
(5 · 2) = 10
 
Theorem5t3e15 8526 5 times 3 equals 15. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.) (Revised by AV, 6-Sep-2021.)
(5 · 3) = 15
 
Theorem5t4e20 8527 5 times 4 equals 20. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.) (Revised by AV, 6-Sep-2021.)
(5 · 4) = 20
 
Theorem5t5e25 8528 5 times 5 equals 25. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.) (Revised by AV, 6-Sep-2021.)
(5 · 5) = 25
 
Theorem6t2e12 8529 6 times 2 equals 12. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(6 · 2) = 12
 
Theorem6t3e18 8530 6 times 3 equals 18. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(6 · 3) = 18
 
Theorem6t4e24 8531 6 times 4 equals 24. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(6 · 4) = 24
 
Theorem6t5e30 8532 6 times 5 equals 30. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.) (Revised by AV, 6-Sep-2021.)
(6 · 5) = 30
 
Theorem6t6e36 8533 6 times 6 equals 36. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.) (Revised by AV, 6-Sep-2021.)
(6 · 6) = 36
 
Theorem7t2e14 8534 7 times 2 equals 14. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(7 · 2) = 14
 
Theorem7t3e21 8535 7 times 3 equals 21. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(7 · 3) = 21
 
Theorem7t4e28 8536 7 times 4 equals 28. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(7 · 4) = 28
 
Theorem7t5e35 8537 7 times 5 equals 35. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(7 · 5) = 35
 
Theorem7t6e42 8538 7 times 6 equals 42. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(7 · 6) = 42
 
Theorem7t7e49 8539 7 times 7 equals 49. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(7 · 7) = 49
 
Theorem8t2e16 8540 8 times 2 equals 16. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(8 · 2) = 16
 
Theorem8t3e24 8541 8 times 3 equals 24. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(8 · 3) = 24
 
Theorem8t4e32 8542 8 times 4 equals 32. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(8 · 4) = 32
 
Theorem8t5e40 8543 8 times 5 equals 40. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.) (Revised by AV, 6-Sep-2021.)
(8 · 5) = 40
 
Theorem8t6e48 8544 8 times 6 equals 48. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.) (Revised by AV, 6-Sep-2021.)
(8 · 6) = 48
 
Theorem8t7e56 8545 8 times 7 equals 56. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(8 · 7) = 56
 
Theorem8t8e64 8546 8 times 8 equals 64. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(8 · 8) = 64
 
Theorem9t2e18 8547 9 times 2 equals 18. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(9 · 2) = 18
 
Theorem9t3e27 8548 9 times 3 equals 27. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(9 · 3) = 27
 
Theorem9t4e36 8549 9 times 4 equals 36. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(9 · 4) = 36
 
Theorem9t5e45 8550 9 times 5 equals 45. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(9 · 5) = 45
 
Theorem9t6e54 8551 9 times 6 equals 54. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(9 · 6) = 54
 
Theorem9t7e63 8552 9 times 7 equals 63. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(9 · 7) = 63
 
Theorem9t8e72 8553 9 times 8 equals 72. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(9 · 8) = 72
 
Theorem9t9e81 8554 9 times 9 equals 81. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2015.)
(9 · 9) = 81
 
Theorem9t11e99 8555 9 times 11 equals 99. (Contributed by AV, 14-Jun-2021.) (Revised by AV, 6-Sep-2021.)
(9 · 11) = 99
 
Theorem9lt10 8556 9 is less than 10. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 8-Feb-2015.) (Revised by AV, 8-Sep-2021.)
9 < 10
 
Theorem8lt10 8557 8 is less than 10. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 8-Feb-2015.) (Revised by AV, 8-Sep-2021.)
8 < 10
 
Theorem7lt10 8558 7 is less than 10. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 10-Mar-2015.) (Revised by AV, 8-Sep-2021.)
7 < 10
 
Theorem6lt10 8559 6 is less than 10. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 10-Mar-2015.) (Revised by AV, 8-Sep-2021.)
6 < 10
 
Theorem5lt10 8560 5 is less than 10. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 10-Mar-2015.) (Revised by AV, 8-Sep-2021.)
5 < 10
 
Theorem4lt10 8561 4 is less than 10. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 10-Mar-2015.) (Revised by AV, 8-Sep-2021.)
4 < 10
 
Theorem3lt10 8562 3 is less than 10. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 10-Mar-2015.) (Revised by AV, 8-Sep-2021.)
3 < 10
 
Theorem2lt10 8563 2 is less than 10. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 10-Mar-2015.) (Revised by AV, 8-Sep-2021.)
2 < 10
 
Theorem1lt10 8564 1 is less than 10. (Contributed by NM, 7-Nov-2012.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 9-Mar-2015.) (Revised by AV, 8-Sep-2021.)
1 < 10
 
Theoremdecbin0 8565 Decompose base 4 into base 2. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 18-Feb-2014.)
𝐴 ∈ ℕ0       (4 · 𝐴) = (2 · (2 · 𝐴))
 
Theoremdecbin2 8566 Decompose base 4 into base 2. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 18-Feb-2014.)
𝐴 ∈ ℕ0       ((4 · 𝐴) + 2) = (2 · ((2 · 𝐴) + 1))
 
Theoremdecbin3 8567 Decompose base 4 into base 2. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 18-Feb-2014.)
𝐴 ∈ ℕ0       ((4 · 𝐴) + 3) = ((2 · ((2 · 𝐴) + 1)) + 1)
 
3.4.10  Upper sets of integers
 
Syntaxcuz 8568 Extend class notation with the upper integer function. Read "𝑀 " as "the set of integers greater than or equal to 𝑀."
class
 
Definitiondf-uz 8569* Define a function whose value at 𝑗 is the semi-infinite set of contiguous integers starting at 𝑗, which we will also call the upper integers starting at 𝑗. Read "𝑀 " as "the set of integers greater than or equal to 𝑀." See uzval 8570 for its value, uzssz 8587 for its relationship to , nnuz 8603 and nn0uz 8602 for its relationships to and 0, and eluz1 8572 and eluz2 8574 for its membership relations. (Contributed by NM, 5-Sep-2005.)
= (𝑗 ∈ ℤ ↦ {𝑘 ∈ ℤ ∣ 𝑗𝑘})
 
Theoremuzval 8570* The value of the upper integers function. (Contributed by NM, 5-Sep-2005.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 3-Nov-2013.)
(𝑁 ∈ ℤ → (ℤ𝑁) = {𝑘 ∈ ℤ ∣ 𝑁𝑘})
 
Theoremuzf 8571 The domain and range of the upper integers function. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 8-Aug-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 3-Nov-2013.)
:ℤ⟶𝒫 ℤ
 
Theoremeluz1 8572 Membership in the upper set of integers starting at 𝑀. (Contributed by NM, 5-Sep-2005.)
(𝑀 ∈ ℤ → (𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) ↔ (𝑁 ∈ ℤ ∧ 𝑀𝑁)))
 
Theoremeluzel2 8573 Implication of membership in an upper set of integers. (Contributed by NM, 6-Sep-2005.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 3-Nov-2013.)
(𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → 𝑀 ∈ ℤ)
 
Theoremeluz2 8574 Membership in an upper set of integers. We use the fact that a function's value (under our function value definition) is empty outside of its domain to show 𝑀 ∈ ℤ. (Contributed by NM, 5-Sep-2005.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 3-Nov-2013.)
(𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) ↔ (𝑀 ∈ ℤ ∧ 𝑁 ∈ ℤ ∧ 𝑀𝑁))
 
Theoremeluz1i 8575 Membership in an upper set of integers. (Contributed by NM, 5-Sep-2005.)
𝑀 ∈ ℤ       (𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) ↔ (𝑁 ∈ ℤ ∧ 𝑀𝑁))
 
Theoremeluzuzle 8576 An integer in an upper set of integers is an element of an upper set of integers with a smaller bound. (Contributed by Alexander van der Vekens, 17-Jun-2018.)
((𝐵 ∈ ℤ ∧ 𝐵𝐴) → (𝐶 ∈ (ℤ𝐴) → 𝐶 ∈ (ℤ𝐵)))
 
Theoremeluzelz 8577 A member of an upper set of integers is an integer. (Contributed by NM, 6-Sep-2005.)
(𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → 𝑁 ∈ ℤ)
 
Theoremeluzelre 8578 A member of an upper set of integers is a real. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 31-Aug-2013.)
(𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → 𝑁 ∈ ℝ)
 
Theoremeluzelcn 8579 A member of an upper set of integers is a complex number. (Contributed by Glauco Siliprandi, 29-Jun-2017.)
(𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → 𝑁 ∈ ℂ)
 
Theoremeluzle 8580 Implication of membership in an upper set of integers. (Contributed by NM, 6-Sep-2005.)
(𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → 𝑀𝑁)
 
Theoremeluz 8581 Membership in an upper set of integers. (Contributed by NM, 2-Oct-2005.)
((𝑀 ∈ ℤ ∧ 𝑁 ∈ ℤ) → (𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) ↔ 𝑀𝑁))
 
Theoremuzid 8582 Membership of the least member in an upper set of integers. (Contributed by NM, 2-Sep-2005.)
(𝑀 ∈ ℤ → 𝑀 ∈ (ℤ𝑀))
 
Theoremuzn0 8583 The upper integers are all nonempty. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 16-Jan-2014.)
(𝑀 ∈ ran ℤ𝑀 ≠ ∅)
 
Theoremuztrn 8584 Transitive law for sets of upper integers. (Contributed by NM, 20-Sep-2005.)
((𝑀 ∈ (ℤ𝐾) ∧ 𝐾 ∈ (ℤ𝑁)) → 𝑀 ∈ (ℤ𝑁))
 
Theoremuztrn2 8585 Transitive law for sets of upper integers. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 26-Dec-2013.)
𝑍 = (ℤ𝐾)       ((𝑁𝑍𝑀 ∈ (ℤ𝑁)) → 𝑀𝑍)
 
Theoremuzneg 8586 Contraposition law for upper integers. (Contributed by NM, 28-Nov-2005.)
(𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → -𝑀 ∈ (ℤ‘-𝑁))
 
Theoremuzssz 8587 An upper set of integers is a subset of all integers. (Contributed by NM, 2-Sep-2005.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 3-Nov-2013.)
(ℤ𝑀) ⊆ ℤ
 
Theoremuzss 8588 Subset relationship for two sets of upper integers. (Contributed by NM, 5-Sep-2005.)
(𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → (ℤ𝑁) ⊆ (ℤ𝑀))
 
Theoremuztric 8589 Trichotomy of the ordering relation on integers, stated in terms of upper integers. (Contributed by NM, 6-Jul-2005.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 25-Jun-2013.)
((𝑀 ∈ ℤ ∧ 𝑁 ∈ ℤ) → (𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) ∨ 𝑀 ∈ (ℤ𝑁)))
 
Theoremuz11 8590 The upper integers function is one-to-one. (Contributed by NM, 12-Dec-2005.)
(𝑀 ∈ ℤ → ((ℤ𝑀) = (ℤ𝑁) ↔ 𝑀 = 𝑁))
 
Theoremeluzp1m1 8591 Membership in the next upper set of integers. (Contributed by NM, 12-Sep-2005.)
((𝑀 ∈ ℤ ∧ 𝑁 ∈ (ℤ‘(𝑀 + 1))) → (𝑁 − 1) ∈ (ℤ𝑀))
 
Theoremeluzp1l 8592 Strict ordering implied by membership in the next upper set of integers. (Contributed by NM, 12-Sep-2005.)
((𝑀 ∈ ℤ ∧ 𝑁 ∈ (ℤ‘(𝑀 + 1))) → 𝑀 < 𝑁)
 
Theoremeluzp1p1 8593 Membership in the next upper set of integers. (Contributed by NM, 5-Oct-2005.)
(𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → (𝑁 + 1) ∈ (ℤ‘(𝑀 + 1)))
 
Theoremeluzaddi 8594 Membership in a later upper set of integers. (Contributed by Paul Chapman, 22-Nov-2007.)
𝑀 ∈ ℤ    &   𝐾 ∈ ℤ       (𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → (𝑁 + 𝐾) ∈ (ℤ‘(𝑀 + 𝐾)))
 
Theoremeluzsubi 8595 Membership in an earlier upper set of integers. (Contributed by Paul Chapman, 22-Nov-2007.)
𝑀 ∈ ℤ    &   𝐾 ∈ ℤ       (𝑁 ∈ (ℤ‘(𝑀 + 𝐾)) → (𝑁𝐾) ∈ (ℤ𝑀))
 
Theoremeluzadd 8596 Membership in a later upper set of integers. (Contributed by Jeff Madsen, 2-Sep-2009.)
((𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) ∧ 𝐾 ∈ ℤ) → (𝑁 + 𝐾) ∈ (ℤ‘(𝑀 + 𝐾)))
 
Theoremeluzsub 8597 Membership in an earlier upper set of integers. (Contributed by Jeff Madsen, 2-Sep-2009.)
((𝑀 ∈ ℤ ∧ 𝐾 ∈ ℤ ∧ 𝑁 ∈ (ℤ‘(𝑀 + 𝐾))) → (𝑁𝐾) ∈ (ℤ𝑀))
 
Theoremuzm1 8598 Choices for an element of an upper interval of integers. (Contributed by Jeff Madsen, 2-Sep-2009.)
(𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → (𝑁 = 𝑀 ∨ (𝑁 − 1) ∈ (ℤ𝑀)))
 
Theoremuznn0sub 8599 The nonnegative difference of integers is a nonnegative integer. (Contributed by NM, 4-Sep-2005.)
(𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → (𝑁𝑀) ∈ ℕ0)
 
Theoremuzin 8600 Intersection of two upper intervals of integers. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 24-Dec-2013.)
((𝑀 ∈ ℤ ∧ 𝑁 ∈ ℤ) → ((ℤ𝑀) ∩ (ℤ𝑁)) = (ℤ‘if(𝑀𝑁, 𝑁, 𝑀)))
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