HomeHome Metamath Proof Explorer
Theorem List (p. 313 of 425)
< Previous  Next >
Bad symbols? Try the
GIF version.

Mirrors  >  Metamath Home Page  >  MPE Home Page  >  Theorem List Contents  >  Recent Proofs       This page: Page List

Color key:    Metamath Proof Explorer  Metamath Proof Explorer
(1-26947)
  Hilbert Space Explorer  Hilbert Space Explorer
(26948-28472)
  Users' Mathboxes  Users' Mathboxes
(28473-42426)
 

Theorem List for Metamath Proof Explorer - 31201-31300   *Has distinct variable group(s)
TypeLabelDescription
Statement
 
Theorembtwnconn1lem3 31201 Lemma for btwnconn1 31213. Establish the next congruence in the series. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 8-Oct-2013.)
((((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑐 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝑑 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑏 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) ∧ (((𝐴𝐵𝐵𝐶) ∧ (𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩ ∧ 𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝐷 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑐⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐷, 𝑐⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩) ∧ (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑑⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑑⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝑐 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑐, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐵⟩) ∧ (𝑑 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑑, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐷, 𝐵⟩)))) → ⟨𝐵, 𝑑⟩Cgr⟨𝑏, 𝐷⟩)
 
Theorembtwnconn1lem4 31202 Lemma for btwnconn1 31213. Assuming 𝐶𝑐, we now attempt to force 𝐷 = 𝑑 from here out via a series of congruences. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 8-Oct-2013.)
((((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑐 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝑑 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑏 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) ∧ (((𝐴𝐵𝐵𝐶𝐶𝑐) ∧ (𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩ ∧ 𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝐷 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑐⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐷, 𝑐⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩) ∧ (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑑⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑑⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝑐 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑐, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐵⟩) ∧ (𝑑 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑑, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐷, 𝐵⟩)))) → ⟨𝑑, 𝑐⟩Cgr⟨𝐷, 𝐶⟩)
 
Theorembtwnconn1lem5 31203 Lemma for btwnconn1 31213. Now, we introduce 𝐸, the intersection of 𝐶𝑐 and 𝐷𝑑. We begin by showing that it is the midpoint of 𝐶 and 𝑐. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 8-Oct-2013.)
((((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑐 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝑑 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑏 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐸 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) ∧ ((((𝐴𝐵𝐵𝐶𝐶𝑐) ∧ (𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩ ∧ 𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝐷 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑐⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐷, 𝑐⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩) ∧ (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑑⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑑⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝑐 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑐, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐵⟩) ∧ (𝑑 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑑, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐷, 𝐵⟩))) ∧ (𝐸 Btwn ⟨𝐶, 𝑐⟩ ∧ 𝐸 Btwn ⟨𝐷, 𝑑⟩))) → ⟨𝐸, 𝐶⟩Cgr⟨𝐸, 𝑐⟩)
 
Theorembtwnconn1lem6 31204 Lemma for btwnconn1 31213. Next, we show that 𝐸 is the midpoint of 𝐷 and 𝑑. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 8-Oct-2013.)
((((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑐 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝑑 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑏 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐸 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) ∧ ((((𝐴𝐵𝐵𝐶𝐶𝑐) ∧ (𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩ ∧ 𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝐷 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑐⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐷, 𝑐⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩) ∧ (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑑⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑑⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝑐 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑐, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐵⟩) ∧ (𝑑 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑑, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐷, 𝐵⟩))) ∧ (𝐸 Btwn ⟨𝐶, 𝑐⟩ ∧ 𝐸 Btwn ⟨𝐷, 𝑑⟩))) → ⟨𝐸, 𝐷⟩Cgr⟨𝐸, 𝑑⟩)
 
Theorembtwnconn1lem7 31205 Lemma for btwnconn1 31213. Under our assumptions, 𝐶 and 𝑑 are distinct. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 8-Oct-2013.)
((((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑐 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝑑 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑏 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐸 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) ∧ ((((𝐴𝐵𝐵𝐶𝐶𝑐) ∧ (𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩ ∧ 𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝐷 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑐⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐷, 𝑐⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩) ∧ (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑑⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑑⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝑐 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑐, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐵⟩) ∧ (𝑑 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑑, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐷, 𝐵⟩))) ∧ (𝐸 Btwn ⟨𝐶, 𝑐⟩ ∧ 𝐸 Btwn ⟨𝐷, 𝑑⟩))) → 𝐶𝑑)
 
Theorembtwnconn1lem8 31206 Lemma for btwnconn1 31213. Now, we introduce the last three points used in the construction: 𝑃, 𝑄, and 𝑅 will turn out to be equal further down, and will provide us with the key to the final statement. We begin by establishing congruence of 𝑅𝑃 and 𝐸𝑑. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 8-Oct-2013.)
((((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ ((𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑐 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝑑 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑏 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐸 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑄 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑅 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) ∧ ((((𝐴𝐵𝐵𝐶𝐶𝑐) ∧ (𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩ ∧ 𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝐷 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑐⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐷, 𝑐⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩) ∧ (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑑⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑑⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝑐 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑐, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐵⟩) ∧ (𝑑 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑑, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐷, 𝐵⟩))) ∧ ((𝐸 Btwn ⟨𝐶, 𝑐⟩ ∧ 𝐸 Btwn ⟨𝐷, 𝑑⟩) ∧ ((𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝑐, 𝑃⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑃⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝑑⟩) ∧ (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝑑, 𝑅⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑅⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐸⟩) ∧ (𝑅 Btwn ⟨𝑃, 𝑄⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑅, 𝑄⟩Cgr⟨𝑅, 𝑃⟩))))) → ⟨𝑅, 𝑃⟩Cgr⟨𝐸, 𝑑⟩)
 
Theorembtwnconn1lem9 31207 Lemma for btwnconn1 31213. Now, a quick use of transitivity to establish congruence on 𝑅𝑄 and 𝐸𝐷. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 8-Oct-2013.)
((((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ ((𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑐 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝑑 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑏 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐸 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑄 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑅 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) ∧ ((((𝐴𝐵𝐵𝐶𝐶𝑐) ∧ (𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩ ∧ 𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝐷 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑐⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐷, 𝑐⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩) ∧ (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑑⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑑⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝑐 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑐, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐵⟩) ∧ (𝑑 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑑, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐷, 𝐵⟩))) ∧ ((𝐸 Btwn ⟨𝐶, 𝑐⟩ ∧ 𝐸 Btwn ⟨𝐷, 𝑑⟩) ∧ ((𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝑐, 𝑃⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑃⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝑑⟩) ∧ (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝑑, 𝑅⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑅⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐸⟩) ∧ (𝑅 Btwn ⟨𝑃, 𝑄⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑅, 𝑄⟩Cgr⟨𝑅, 𝑃⟩))))) → ⟨𝑅, 𝑄⟩Cgr⟨𝐸, 𝐷⟩)
 
Theorembtwnconn1lem10 31208 Lemma for btwnconn1 31213. Now we establish a congruence that will give us 𝐷 = 𝑑 when we compute 𝑃 = 𝑄 later on. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 8-Oct-2013.)
((((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ ((𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑐 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝑑 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑏 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐸 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑄 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑅 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) ∧ ((((𝐴𝐵𝐵𝐶𝐶𝑐) ∧ (𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩ ∧ 𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝐷 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑐⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐷, 𝑐⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩) ∧ (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑑⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑑⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝑐 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑐, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐵⟩) ∧ (𝑑 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑑, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐷, 𝐵⟩))) ∧ ((𝐸 Btwn ⟨𝐶, 𝑐⟩ ∧ 𝐸 Btwn ⟨𝐷, 𝑑⟩) ∧ ((𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝑐, 𝑃⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑃⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝑑⟩) ∧ (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝑑, 𝑅⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑅⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐸⟩) ∧ (𝑅 Btwn ⟨𝑃, 𝑄⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑅, 𝑄⟩Cgr⟨𝑅, 𝑃⟩))))) → ⟨𝑑, 𝐷⟩Cgr⟨𝑃, 𝑄⟩)
 
Theorembtwnconn1lem11 31209 Lemma for btwnconn1 31213. Now, we establish that 𝐷 and 𝑄 are equidistant from 𝐶. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 8-Oct-2013.)
((((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ ((𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑐 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝑑 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑏 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐸 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑄 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑅 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) ∧ ((((𝐴𝐵𝐵𝐶𝐶𝑐) ∧ (𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩ ∧ 𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝐷 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑐⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐷, 𝑐⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩) ∧ (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑑⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑑⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝑐 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑐, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐵⟩) ∧ (𝑑 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑑, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐷, 𝐵⟩))) ∧ ((𝐸 Btwn ⟨𝐶, 𝑐⟩ ∧ 𝐸 Btwn ⟨𝐷, 𝑑⟩) ∧ ((𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝑐, 𝑃⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑃⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝑑⟩) ∧ (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝑑, 𝑅⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑅⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐸⟩) ∧ (𝑅 Btwn ⟨𝑃, 𝑄⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑅, 𝑄⟩Cgr⟨𝑅, 𝑃⟩))))) → ⟨𝐷, 𝐶⟩Cgr⟨𝑄, 𝐶⟩)
 
Theorembtwnconn1lem12 31210 Lemma for btwnconn1 31213. Using a long string of invocations of linecgr 31193, we show that 𝐷 = 𝑑. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 9-Oct-2013.)
((((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ ((𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑐 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝑑 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑏 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐸 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑄 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑅 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) ∧ ((((𝐴𝐵𝐵𝐶𝐶𝑐) ∧ (𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩ ∧ 𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝐷 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑐⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐷, 𝑐⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩) ∧ (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑑⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑑⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝑐 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑐, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐵⟩) ∧ (𝑑 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑑, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐷, 𝐵⟩))) ∧ ((𝐸 Btwn ⟨𝐶, 𝑐⟩ ∧ 𝐸 Btwn ⟨𝐷, 𝑑⟩) ∧ ((𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝑐, 𝑃⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑃⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝑑⟩) ∧ (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝑑, 𝑅⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑅⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐸⟩) ∧ (𝑅 Btwn ⟨𝑃, 𝑄⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑅, 𝑄⟩Cgr⟨𝑅, 𝑃⟩))))) → 𝐷 = 𝑑)
 
Theorembtwnconn1lem13 31211 Lemma for btwnconn1 31213. Begin back-filling and eliminating hypotheses. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 9-Oct-2013.)
((((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ ((𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑐 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝑑 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑏 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)))) ∧ (((𝐴𝐵𝐵𝐶) ∧ (𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩ ∧ 𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝐷 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑐⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐷, 𝑐⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩) ∧ (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑑⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝑑⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩)) ∧ ((𝑐 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑐, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐵⟩) ∧ (𝑑 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑏⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑑, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝐷, 𝐵⟩)))) → (𝐶 = 𝑐𝐷 = 𝑑))
 
Theorembtwnconn1lem14 31212 Lemma for btwnconn1 31213. Final statement of the theorem when 𝐵𝐶. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 9-Oct-2013.)
(((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) ∧ ((𝐴𝐵𝐵𝐶) ∧ (𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩ ∧ 𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩))) → (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩ ∨ 𝐷 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩))
 
Theorembtwnconn1 31213 Connectitivy law for betweenness. Theorem 5.1 of [Schwabhauser] p. 39-41. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 9-Oct-2013.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → ((𝐴𝐵𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩ ∧ 𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩) → (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩ ∨ 𝐷 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩)))
 
Theorembtwnconn2 31214 Another connectivity law for betweenness. Theorem 5.2 of [Schwabhauser] p. 41. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 9-Oct-2013.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → ((𝐴𝐵𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩ ∧ 𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩) → (𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝐵, 𝐷⟩ ∨ 𝐷 Btwn ⟨𝐵, 𝐶⟩)))
 
Theorembtwnconn3 31215 Inner connectivity law for betweenness. Theorem 5.3 of [Schwabhauser] p. 41. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 9-Oct-2013.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → ((𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩ ∧ 𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩) → (𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩ ∨ 𝐶 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩)))
 
Theoremmidofsegid 31216 If two points fall in the same place in the middle of a segment, then they are identical. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 16-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐸 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → ((𝐷 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ ∧ 𝐸 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐴, 𝐷⟩Cgr⟨𝐴, 𝐸⟩) → 𝐷 = 𝐸))
 
Theoremsegcon2 31217* Generalization of axsegcon 25497. This time, we generate an endpoint for a segment on the ray 𝑄𝐴 congruent to 𝐵𝐶 and starting at 𝑄, as opposed to axsegcon 25497, where the segment starts at 𝐴 (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 14-Oct-2013.) (Removed unneeded inequality, 15-Oct-2013.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝑄 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → ∃𝑥 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)((𝐴 Btwn ⟨𝑄, 𝑥⟩ ∨ 𝑥 Btwn ⟨𝑄, 𝐴⟩) ∧ ⟨𝑄, 𝑥⟩Cgr⟨𝐵, 𝐶⟩))
 
20.8.29.6  Segment less than or equal to
 
Syntaxcsegle 31218 Declare the constant for the segment less than or equal to relationship.
class Seg
 
Definitiondf-segle 31219* Define the segment length comparison relationship. This relationship expresses that the segment 𝐴𝐵 is no longer than 𝐶𝐷. In this section, we establish various properties of this relationship showing that it is a transitive, reflexive relationship on pairs of points that is substitutive under congruence. Definition 5.4 of [Schwabhauser] p. 41. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 11-Oct-2013.)
Seg = {⟨𝑝, 𝑞⟩ ∣ ∃𝑛 ∈ ℕ ∃𝑎 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑛)∃𝑏 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑛)∃𝑐 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑛)∃𝑑 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑛)(𝑝 = ⟨𝑎, 𝑏⟩ ∧ 𝑞 = ⟨𝑐, 𝑑⟩ ∧ ∃𝑦 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑛)(𝑦 Btwn ⟨𝑐, 𝑑⟩ ∧ ⟨𝑎, 𝑏⟩Cgr⟨𝑐, 𝑦⟩))}
 
Theorembrsegle 31220* Binary relationship form of the segment comparison relationship. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 11-Oct-2013.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → (⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ Seg𝐶, 𝐷⟩ ↔ ∃𝑦 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)(𝑦 Btwn ⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝑦⟩)))
 
Theorembrsegle2 31221* Alternate characterization of segment comparison. Theorem 5.5 of [Schwabhauser] p. 41-42. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 11-Oct-2013.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → (⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ Seg𝐶, 𝐷⟩ ↔ ∃𝑥 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)(𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑥⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐴, 𝑥⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩)))
 
Theoremseglecgr12im 31222 Substitution law for segment comparison under congruence. Theorem 5.6 of [Schwabhauser] p. 42. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 11-Oct-2013.)
(((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐸 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐹 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐺 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐻 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → ((⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩Cgr⟨𝐸, 𝐹⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩Cgr⟨𝐺, 𝐻⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ Seg𝐶, 𝐷⟩) → ⟨𝐸, 𝐹⟩ Seg𝐺, 𝐻⟩))
 
Theoremseglecgr12 31223 Substitution law for segment comparison under congruence. Biconditional version. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 15-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
(((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐸 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐹 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐺 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐻 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → ((⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩Cgr⟨𝐸, 𝐹⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩Cgr⟨𝐺, 𝐻⟩) → (⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ Seg𝐶, 𝐷⟩ ↔ ⟨𝐸, 𝐹⟩ Seg𝐺, 𝐻⟩)))
 
Theoremseglerflx 31224 Segment comparison is reflexive. Theorem 5.7 of [Schwabhauser] p. 42. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 11-Oct-2013.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) → ⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ Seg𝐴, 𝐵⟩)
 
Theoremseglemin 31225 Any segment is at least as long as a degenerate segment. Theorem 5.11 of [Schwabhauser] p. 42. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 11-Oct-2013.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → ⟨𝐴, 𝐴⟩ Seg𝐵, 𝐶⟩)
 
Theoremsegletr 31226 Segment less than is transitive. Theorem 5.8 of [Schwabhauser] p. 42. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 11-Oct-2013.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐸 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐹 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → ((⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ Seg𝐶, 𝐷⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩ Seg𝐸, 𝐹⟩) → ⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ Seg𝐸, 𝐹⟩))
 
Theoremsegleantisym 31227 Antisymmetry law for segment comparison. Theorem 5.9 of [Schwabhauser] p. 42. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 14-Oct-2013.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → ((⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ Seg𝐶, 𝐷⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩ Seg𝐴, 𝐵⟩) → ⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩Cgr⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩))
 
Theoremseglelin 31228 Linearity law for segment comparison. Theorem 5.10 of [Schwabhauser] p. 42. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 14-Oct-2013.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐷 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → (⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ Seg𝐶, 𝐷⟩ ∨ ⟨𝐶, 𝐷⟩ Seg𝐴, 𝐵⟩))
 
Theorembtwnsegle 31229 If 𝐵 falls between 𝐴 and 𝐶, then 𝐴𝐵 is no longer than 𝐴𝐶. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 16-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → (𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩ → ⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ Seg𝐴, 𝐶⟩))
 
Theoremcolinbtwnle 31230 Given three colinear points 𝐴, 𝐵, and 𝐶, 𝐵 falls in the middle iff the two segments to 𝐵 are no longer than 𝐴𝐶. Theorem 5.12 of [Schwabhauser] p. 42. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 15-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → (𝐴 Colinear ⟨𝐵, 𝐶⟩ → (𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩ ↔ (⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ Seg𝐴, 𝐶⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐵, 𝐶⟩ Seg𝐴, 𝐶⟩))))
 
20.8.29.7  Outside of relationship
 
Syntaxcoutsideof 31231 Declare the syntax for the outside of constant.
class OutsideOf
 
Definitiondf-outsideof 31232 The outside of relationship. This relationship expresses that 𝑃, 𝐴, and 𝐵 fall on a line, but 𝑃 is not on the segment 𝐴𝐵. This definition is taken from theorem 6.4 of [Schwabhauser] p. 43, since it requires no dummy variables. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 17-Oct-2013.)
OutsideOf = ( Colinear ∖ Btwn )
 
Theorembroutsideof 31233 Binary relationship form of OutsideOf. Theorem 6.4 of [Schwabhauser] p. 43. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 17-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
(𝑃OutsideOf⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ ↔ (𝑃 Colinear ⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ ∧ ¬ 𝑃 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩))
 
Theorembroutsideof2 31234 Alternate form of OutsideOf. Definition 6.1 of [Schwabhauser] p. 43. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 17-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → (𝑃OutsideOf⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ ↔ (𝐴𝑃𝐵𝑃 ∧ (𝐴 Btwn ⟨𝑃, 𝐵⟩ ∨ 𝐵 Btwn ⟨𝑃, 𝐴⟩))))
 
Theoremoutsidene1 31235 Outsideness implies inequality. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 18-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → (𝑃OutsideOf⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ → 𝐴𝑃))
 
Theoremoutsidene2 31236 Outsideness implies inequality. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 18-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → (𝑃OutsideOf⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ → 𝐵𝑃))
 
Theorembtwnoutside 31237 A principle linking outsideness to betweenness. Theorem 6.2 of [Schwabhauser] p. 43. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 18-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → (((𝐴𝑃𝐵𝑃𝐶𝑃) ∧ 𝑃 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩) → (𝑃 Btwn ⟨𝐵, 𝐶⟩ ↔ 𝑃OutsideOf⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩)))
 
Theorembroutsideof3 31238* Characterization of outsideness in terms of relationship to a fourth point. Theorem 6.3 of [Schwabhauser] p. 43. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 18-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → (𝑃OutsideOf⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ ↔ (𝐴𝑃𝐵𝑃 ∧ ∃𝑐 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)(𝑐𝑃𝑃 Btwn ⟨𝐴, 𝑐⟩ ∧ 𝑃 Btwn ⟨𝐵, 𝑐⟩))))
 
Theoremoutsideofrflx 31239 Reflexitivity of outsideness. Theorem 6.5 of [Schwabhauser] p. 44. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 18-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) → (𝐴𝑃𝑃OutsideOf⟨𝐴, 𝐴⟩))
 
Theoremoutsideofcom 31240 Commutitivity law for outsideness. Theorem 6.6 of [Schwabhauser] p. 44. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 18-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → (𝑃OutsideOf⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ ↔ 𝑃OutsideOf⟨𝐵, 𝐴⟩))
 
Theoremoutsideoftr 31241 Transitivity law for outsideness. Theorem 6.7 of [Schwabhauser] p. 44. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 18-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → ((𝑃OutsideOf⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ ∧ 𝑃OutsideOf⟨𝐵, 𝐶⟩) → 𝑃OutsideOf⟨𝐴, 𝐶⟩))
 
Theoremoutsideofeq 31242 Uniqueness law for OutsideOf. Analogue of segconeq 31122. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 24-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑅 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑋 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑌 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → (((𝐴OutsideOf⟨𝑋, 𝑅⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐴, 𝑋⟩Cgr⟨𝐵, 𝐶⟩) ∧ (𝐴OutsideOf⟨𝑌, 𝑅⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐴, 𝑌⟩Cgr⟨𝐵, 𝐶⟩)) → 𝑋 = 𝑌))
 
Theoremoutsideofeu 31243* Given a non-degenerate ray, there is a unique point congruent to the segment 𝐵𝐶 lying on the ray 𝐴𝑅. Theorem 6.11 of [Schwabhauser] p. 44. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 23-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑅 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐶 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → ((𝑅𝐴𝐵𝐶) → ∃!𝑥 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)(𝐴OutsideOf⟨𝑥, 𝑅⟩ ∧ ⟨𝐴, 𝑥⟩Cgr⟨𝐵, 𝐶⟩)))
 
Theoremoutsidele 31244 Relate OutsideOf to Seg. Theorem 6.13 of [Schwabhauser] p. 45. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 24-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁))) → (𝑃OutsideOf⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩ → (⟨𝑃, 𝐴⟩ Seg𝑃, 𝐵⟩ ↔ 𝐴 Btwn ⟨𝑃, 𝐵⟩)))
 
Theoremoutsideofcol 31245 Outside of implies colinearity. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 26-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
(𝑃OutsideOf⟨𝑄, 𝑅⟩ → 𝑃 Colinear ⟨𝑄, 𝑅⟩)
 
20.8.29.8  Lines and Rays
 
Syntaxcline2 31246 Declare the constant for the line function.
class Line
 
Syntaxcray 31247 Declare the constant for the ray function.
class Ray
 
Syntaxclines2 31248 Declare the constant for the set of all lines.
class LinesEE
 
Definitiondf-line2 31249* Define the Line function. This function generates the line passing through the distinct points 𝑎 and 𝑏. Adapted from definition 6.14 of [Schwabhauser] p. 45. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 25-Oct-2013.)
Line = {⟨⟨𝑎, 𝑏⟩, 𝑙⟩ ∣ ∃𝑛 ∈ ℕ ((𝑎 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑛) ∧ 𝑏 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑛) ∧ 𝑎𝑏) ∧ 𝑙 = [⟨𝑎, 𝑏⟩] Colinear )}
 
Definitiondf-ray 31250* Define the Ray function. This function generates the set of all points that lie on the ray starting at 𝑝 and passing through 𝑎. Definition 6.8 of [Schwabhauser] p. 44. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 21-Oct-2013.)
Ray = {⟨⟨𝑝, 𝑎⟩, 𝑟⟩ ∣ ∃𝑛 ∈ ℕ ((𝑝 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑛) ∧ 𝑎 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑛) ∧ 𝑝𝑎) ∧ 𝑟 = {𝑥 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑛) ∣ 𝑝OutsideOf⟨𝑎, 𝑥⟩})}
 
Definitiondf-lines2 31251 Define the set of all lines. Definition 6.14, part 2 of [Schwabhauser] p. 45. See ellines 31264 for membership. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 28-Oct-2013.)
LinesEE = ran Line
 
Theoremfunray 31252 Show that the Ray relationship is a function. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 21-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
Fun Ray
 
Theoremfvray 31253* Calculate the value of the Ray function. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 21-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑃𝐴)) → (𝑃Ray𝐴) = {𝑥 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∣ 𝑃OutsideOf⟨𝐴, 𝑥⟩})
 
Theoremfunline 31254 Show that the Line relationship is a function. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 25-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
Fun Line
 
Theoremlinedegen 31255 When Line is applied with the same argument, the result is the empty set. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 29-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
(𝐴Line𝐴) = ∅
 
Theoremfvline 31256* Calculate the value of the Line function. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 25-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐴𝐵)) → (𝐴Line𝐵) = {𝑥𝑥 Colinear ⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩})
 
Theoremliness 31257 A line is a subset of the space its two points lie in. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 25-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐴𝐵)) → (𝐴Line𝐵) ⊆ (𝔼‘𝑁))
 
Theoremfvline2 31258* Alternate definition of a line. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 25-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐴 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝐴𝐵)) → (𝐴Line𝐵) = {𝑥 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∣ 𝑥 Colinear ⟨𝐴, 𝐵⟩})
 
Theoremlineunray 31259 A line is composed of a point and the two rays emerging from it. Theorem 6.15 of [Schwabhauser] p. 45. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 26-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑄 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑅 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁)) ∧ (𝑃𝑄𝑃𝑅)) → (𝑃 Btwn ⟨𝑄, 𝑅⟩ → (𝑃Line𝑄) = (((𝑃Ray𝑄) ∪ {𝑃}) ∪ (𝑃Ray𝑅))))
 
Theoremlineelsb2 31260 If 𝑆 lies on 𝑃𝑄, then 𝑃𝑄 = 𝑃𝑆. Theorem 6.16 of [Schwabhauser] p. 45. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 27-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑄 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑃𝑄) ∧ (𝑆 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑃𝑆)) → (𝑆 ∈ (𝑃Line𝑄) → (𝑃Line𝑄) = (𝑃Line𝑆)))
 
Theoremlinerflx1 31261 Reflexivity law for line membership. Part of theorem 6.17 of [Schwabhauser] p. 45. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 28-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑄 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑃𝑄)) → 𝑃 ∈ (𝑃Line𝑄))
 
Theoremlinecom 31262 Commutativity law for lines. Part of theorem 6.17 of [Schwabhauser] p. 45. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 28-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑄 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑃𝑄)) → (𝑃Line𝑄) = (𝑄Line𝑃))
 
Theoremlinerflx2 31263 Reflexivity law for line membership. Part of theorem 6.17 of [Schwabhauser] p. 45. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 28-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑄 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑃𝑄)) → 𝑄 ∈ (𝑃Line𝑄))
 
Theoremellines 31264* Membership in the set of all lines. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 28-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
(𝐴 ∈ LinesEE ↔ ∃𝑛 ∈ ℕ ∃𝑝 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑛)∃𝑞 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑛)(𝑝𝑞𝐴 = (𝑝Line𝑞)))
 
Theoremlinethru 31265 If 𝐴 is a line containing two distinct points 𝑃 and 𝑄, then 𝐴 is the line through 𝑃 and 𝑄. Theorem 6.18 of [Schwabhauser] p. 45. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 28-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝐴 ∈ LinesEE ∧ (𝑃𝐴𝑄𝐴) ∧ 𝑃𝑄) → 𝐴 = (𝑃Line𝑄))
 
Theoremhilbert1.1 31266* There is a line through any two distinct points. Hilbert's axiom I.1 for geometry. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 29-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑄 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑃𝑄)) → ∃𝑥 ∈ LinesEE (𝑃𝑥𝑄𝑥))
 
Theoremhilbert1.2 31267* There is at most one line through any two distinct points. Hilbert's axiom I.2 for geometry. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 29-Oct-2013.) (Revised by NM, 17-Jun-2017.)
(𝑃𝑄 → ∃*𝑥 ∈ LinesEE (𝑃𝑥𝑄𝑥))
 
Theoremlinethrueu 31268* There is a unique line going through any two distinct points. Theorem 6.19 of [Schwabhauser] p. 46. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 29-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝑃 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑄 ∈ (𝔼‘𝑁) ∧ 𝑃𝑄)) → ∃!𝑥 ∈ LinesEE (𝑃𝑥𝑄𝑥))
 
Theoremlineintmo 31269* Two distinct lines intersect in at most one point. Theorem 6.21 of [Schwabhauser] p. 46. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 29-Oct-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 19-Apr-2014.)
((𝐴 ∈ LinesEE ∧ 𝐵 ∈ LinesEE ∧ 𝐴𝐵) → ∃*𝑥(𝑥𝐴𝑥𝐵))
 
20.8.30  Forward difference
 
Syntaxcfwddif 31270 Declare the syntax for the forward difference operator.
class
 
Definitiondf-fwddif 31271* Define the forward difference operator. This is a discrete analogue of the derivative operator. Definition 2.42 of [GramKnuthPat], p. 47. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 18-May-2020.)
△ = (𝑓 ∈ (ℂ ↑pm ℂ) ↦ (𝑥 ∈ {𝑦 ∈ dom 𝑓 ∣ (𝑦 + 1) ∈ dom 𝑓} ↦ ((𝑓‘(𝑥 + 1)) − (𝑓𝑥))))
 
Syntaxcfwddifn 31272 Declare the syntax for the nth forward difference operator.
class n
 
Definitiondf-fwddifn 31273* Define the nth forward difference operator. This works out to be the forward difference operator iterated 𝑛 times. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 28-May-2020.)
n = (𝑛 ∈ ℕ0, 𝑓 ∈ (ℂ ↑pm ℂ) ↦ (𝑥 ∈ {𝑦 ∈ ℂ ∣ ∀𝑘 ∈ (0...𝑛)(𝑦 + 𝑘) ∈ dom 𝑓} ↦ Σ𝑘 ∈ (0...𝑛)((𝑛C𝑘) · ((-1↑(𝑛𝑘)) · (𝑓‘(𝑥 + 𝑘))))))
 
Theoremfwddifval 31274 Calculate the value of the forward difference operator at a point. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 18-May-2020.)
(𝜑𝐴 ⊆ ℂ)    &   (𝜑𝐹:𝐴⟶ℂ)    &   (𝜑𝑋𝐴)    &   (𝜑 → (𝑋 + 1) ∈ 𝐴)       (𝜑 → (( △ ‘𝐹)‘𝑋) = ((𝐹‘(𝑋 + 1)) − (𝐹𝑋)))
 
Theoremfwddifnval 31275* The value of the forward difference operator at a point. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 28-May-2020.)
(𝜑𝑁 ∈ ℕ0)    &   (𝜑𝐴 ⊆ ℂ)    &   (𝜑𝐹:𝐴⟶ℂ)    &   (𝜑𝑋 ∈ ℂ)    &   ((𝜑𝑘 ∈ (0...𝑁)) → (𝑋 + 𝑘) ∈ 𝐴)       (𝜑 → ((𝑁n 𝐹)‘𝑋) = Σ𝑘 ∈ (0...𝑁)((𝑁C𝑘) · ((-1↑(𝑁𝑘)) · (𝐹‘(𝑋 + 𝑘)))))
 
Theoremfwddifn0 31276 The value of the n-iterated forward difference operator at zero is just the function value. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 28-May-2020.)
(𝜑𝐴 ⊆ ℂ)    &   (𝜑𝐹:𝐴⟶ℂ)    &   (𝜑𝑋𝐴)       (𝜑 → ((0 △n 𝐹)‘𝑋) = (𝐹𝑋))
 
Theoremfwddifnp1 31277* The value of the n-iterated forward difference at a successor. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 28-May-2020.)
(𝜑𝑁 ∈ ℕ0)    &   (𝜑𝐴 ⊆ ℂ)    &   (𝜑𝐹:𝐴⟶ℂ)    &   (𝜑𝑋 ∈ ℂ)    &   ((𝜑𝑘 ∈ (0...(𝑁 + 1))) → (𝑋 + 𝑘) ∈ 𝐴)       (𝜑 → (((𝑁 + 1) △n 𝐹)‘𝑋) = (((𝑁n 𝐹)‘(𝑋 + 1)) − ((𝑁n 𝐹)‘𝑋)))
 
20.8.31  Rank theorems
 
Theoremrankung 31278 The rank of the union of two sets. Closed form of rankun 8478. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 15-Jul-2015.)
((𝐴𝑉𝐵𝑊) → (rank‘(𝐴𝐵)) = ((rank‘𝐴) ∪ (rank‘𝐵)))
 
Theoremranksng 31279 The rank of a singleton. Closed form of ranksn 8476. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 15-Jul-2015.)
(𝐴𝑉 → (rank‘{𝐴}) = suc (rank‘𝐴))
 
Theoremrankelg 31280 The membership relation is inherited by the rank function. Closed form of rankel 8461. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 16-Jul-2015.)
((𝐵𝑉𝐴𝐵) → (rank‘𝐴) ∈ (rank‘𝐵))
 
Theoremrankpwg 31281 The rank of a power set. Closed form of rankpw 8465. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 16-Jul-2015.)
(𝐴𝑉 → (rank‘𝒫 𝐴) = suc (rank‘𝐴))
 
Theoremrank0 31282 The rank of the empty set is . (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 17-Jul-2015.)
(rank‘∅) = ∅
 
Theoremrankeq1o 31283 The only set with rank 1𝑜 is the singleton of the empty set. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 17-Jul-2015.)
((rank‘𝐴) = 1𝑜𝐴 = {∅})
 
20.8.32  Hereditarily Finite Sets
 
Syntaxchf 31284 The constant Hf is a class.
class Hf
 
Definitiondf-hf 31285 Define the hereditarily finite sets. These are the finite sets whose elements are finite, and so forth. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 9-Jul-2015.)
Hf = (𝑅1 “ ω)
 
Theoremelhf 31286* Membership in the hereditarily finite sets. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 9-Jul-2015.)
(𝐴 ∈ Hf ↔ ∃𝑥 ∈ ω 𝐴 ∈ (𝑅1𝑥))
 
Theoremelhf2 31287 Alternate form of membership in the hereditarily finite sets. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 13-Jul-2015.)
𝐴 ∈ V       (𝐴 ∈ Hf ↔ (rank‘𝐴) ∈ ω)
 
Theoremelhf2g 31288 Hereditarily finiteness via rank. Closed form of elhf2 31287. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 15-Jul-2015.)
(𝐴𝑉 → (𝐴 ∈ Hf ↔ (rank‘𝐴) ∈ ω))
 
Theorem0hf 31289 The empty set is a hereditarily finite set. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 9-Jul-2015.)
∅ ∈ Hf
 
Theoremhfun 31290 The union of two HF sets is an HF set. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 15-Jul-2015.)
((𝐴 ∈ Hf ∧ 𝐵 ∈ Hf ) → (𝐴𝐵) ∈ Hf )
 
Theoremhfsn 31291 The singleton of an HF set is an HF set. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 15-Jul-2015.)
(𝐴 ∈ Hf → {𝐴} ∈ Hf )
 
Theoremhfadj 31292 Adjoining one HF element to an HF set preserves HF status. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 15-Jul-2015.)
((𝐴 ∈ Hf ∧ 𝐵 ∈ Hf ) → (𝐴 ∪ {𝐵}) ∈ Hf )
 
Theoremhfelhf 31293 Any member of an HF set is itself an HF set. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 16-Jul-2015.)
((𝐴𝐵𝐵 ∈ Hf ) → 𝐴 ∈ Hf )
 
Theoremhftr 31294 The class of all hereditarily finite sets is transitive. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 16-Jul-2015.)
Tr Hf
 
Theoremhfext 31295* Extensionality for HF sets depends only on comparison of HF elements. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 16-Jul-2015.)
((𝐴 ∈ Hf ∧ 𝐵 ∈ Hf ) → (𝐴 = 𝐵 ↔ ∀𝑥 ∈ Hf (𝑥𝐴𝑥𝐵)))
 
Theoremhfuni 31296 The union of an HF set is itself hereditarily finite. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 16-Jul-2015.)
(𝐴 ∈ Hf → 𝐴 ∈ Hf )
 
Theoremhfpw 31297 The power class of an HF set is hereditarily finite. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 16-Jul-2015.)
(𝐴 ∈ Hf → 𝒫 𝐴 ∈ Hf )
 
Theoremhfninf 31298 ω is not hereditarily finite. (Contributed by Scott Fenton, 16-Jul-2015.)
¬ ω ∈ Hf
 
20.9  Mathbox for Jeff Hankins
 
20.9.1  Miscellany
 
Theorema1i14 31299 Add two antecedents to a wff. (Contributed by Jeff Hankins, 4-Aug-2009.)
(𝜓 → (𝜒𝜏))       (𝜑 → (𝜓 → (𝜒 → (𝜃𝜏))))
 
Theorema1i24 31300 Add two antecedents to a wff. (Contributed by Jeff Hankins, 5-Aug-2009.)
(𝜑 → (𝜒𝜏))       (𝜑 → (𝜓 → (𝜒 → (𝜃𝜏))))
    < Previous  Next >

Page List
Jump to page: Contents  1 1-100 2 101-200 3 201-300 4 301-400 5 401-500 6 501-600 7 601-700 8 701-800 9 801-900 10 901-1000 11 1001-1100 12 1101-1200 13 1201-1300 14 1301-1400 15 1401-1500 16 1501-1600 17 1601-1700 18 1701-1800 19 1801-1900 20 1901-2000 21 2001-2100 22 2101-2200 23 2201-2300 24 2301-2400 25 2401-2500 26 2501-2600 27 2601-2700 28 2701-2800 29 2801-2900 30 2901-3000 31 3001-3100 32 3101-3200 33 3201-3300 34 3301-3400 35 3401-3500 36 3501-3600 37 3601-3700 38 3701-3800 39 3801-3900 40 3901-4000 41 4001-4100 42 4101-4200 43 4201-4300 44 4301-4400 45 4401-4500 46 4501-4600 47 4601-4700 48 4701-4800 49 4801-4900 50 4901-5000 51 5001-5100 52 5101-5200 53 5201-5300 54 5301-5400 55 5401-5500 56 5501-5600 57 5601-5700 58 5701-5800 59 5801-5900 60 5901-6000 61 6001-6100 62 6101-6200 63 6201-6300 64 6301-6400 65 6401-6500 66 6501-6600 67 6601-6700 68 6701-6800 69 6801-6900 70 6901-7000 71 7001-7100 72 7101-7200 73 7201-7300 74 7301-7400 75 7401-7500 76 7501-7600 77 7601-7700 78 7701-7800 79 7801-7900 80 7901-8000 81 8001-8100 82 8101-8200 83 8201-8300 84 8301-8400 85 8401-8500 86 8501-8600 87 8601-8700 88 8701-8800 89 8801-8900 90 8901-9000 91 9001-9100 92 9101-9200 93 9201-9300 94 9301-9400 95 9401-9500 96 9501-9600 97 9601-9700 98 9701-9800 99 9801-9900 100 9901-10000 101 10001-10100 102 10101-10200 103 10201-10300 104 10301-10400 105 10401-10500 106 10501-10600 107 10601-10700 108 10701-10800 109 10801-10900 110 10901-11000 111 11001-11100 112 11101-11200 113 11201-11300 114 11301-11400 115 11401-11500 116 11501-11600 117 11601-11700 118 11701-11800 119 11801-11900 120 11901-12000 121 12001-12100 122 12101-12200 123 12201-12300 124 12301-12400 125 12401-12500 126 12501-12600 127 12601-12700 128 12701-12800 129 12801-12900 130 12901-13000 131 13001-13100 132 13101-13200 133 13201-13300 134 13301-13400 135 13401-13500 136 13501-13600 137 13601-13700 138 13701-13800 139 13801-13900 140 13901-14000 141 14001-14100 142 14101-14200 143 14201-14300 144 14301-14400 145 14401-14500 146 14501-14600 147 14601-14700 148 14701-14800 149 14801-14900 150 14901-15000 151 15001-15100 152 15101-15200 153 15201-15300 154 15301-15400 155 15401-15500 156 15501-15600 157 15601-15700 158 15701-15800 159 15801-15900 160 15901-16000 161 16001-16100 162 16101-16200 163 16201-16300 164 16301-16400 165 16401-16500 166 16501-16600 167 16601-16700 168 16701-16800 169 16801-16900 170 16901-17000 171 17001-17100 172 17101-17200 173 17201-17300 174 17301-17400 175 17401-17500 176 17501-17600 177 17601-17700 178 17701-17800 179 17801-17900 180 17901-18000 181 18001-18100 182 18101-18200 183 18201-18300 184 18301-18400 185 18401-18500 186 18501-18600 187 18601-18700 188 18701-18800 189 18801-18900 190 18901-19000 191 19001-19100 192 19101-19200 193 19201-19300 194 19301-19400 195 19401-19500 196 19501-19600 197 19601-19700 198 19701-19800 199 19801-19900 200 19901-20000 201 20001-20100 202 20101-20200 203 20201-20300 204 20301-20400 205 20401-20500 206 20501-20600 207 20601-20700 208 20701-20800 209 20801-20900 210 20901-21000 211 21001-21100 212 21101-21200 213 21201-21300 214 21301-21400 215 21401-21500 216 21501-21600 217 21601-21700 218 21701-21800 219 21801-21900 220 21901-22000 221 22001-22100 222 22101-22200 223 22201-22300 224 22301-22400 225 22401-22500 226 22501-22600 227 22601-22700 228 22701-22800 229 22801-22900 230 22901-23000 231 23001-23100 232 23101-23200 233 23201-23300 234 23301-23400 235 23401-23500 236 23501-23600 237 23601-23700 238 23701-23800 239 23801-23900 240 23901-24000 241 24001-24100 242 24101-24200 243 24201-24300 244 24301-24400 245 24401-24500 246 24501-24600 247 24601-24700 248 24701-24800 249 24801-24900 250 24901-25000 251 25001-25100 252 25101-25200 253 25201-25300 254 25301-25400 255 25401-25500 256 25501-25600 257 25601-25700 258 25701-25800 259 25801-25900 260 25901-26000 261 26001-26100 262 26101-26200 263 26201-26300 264 26301-26400 265 26401-26500 266 26501-26600 267 26601-26700 268 26701-26800 269 26801-26900 270 26901-27000 271 27001-27100 272 27101-27200 273 27201-27300 274 27301-27400 275 27401-27500 276 27501-27600 277 27601-27700 278 27701-27800 279 27801-27900 280 27901-28000 281 28001-28100 282 28101-28200 283 28201-28300 284 28301-28400 285 28401-28500 286 28501-28600 287 28601-28700 288 28701-28800 289 28801-28900 290 28901-29000 291 29001-29100 292 29101-29200 293 29201-29300 294 29301-29400 295 29401-29500 296 29501-29600 297 29601-29700 298 29701-29800 299 29801-29900 300 29901-30000 301 30001-30100 302 30101-30200 303 30201-30300 304 30301-30400 305 30401-30500 306 30501-30600 307 30601-30700 308 30701-30800 309 30801-30900 310 30901-31000 311 31001-31100 312 31101-31200 313 31201-31300 314 31301-31400 315 31401-31500 316 31501-31600 317 31601-31700 318 31701-31800 319 31801-31900 320 31901-32000 321 32001-32100 322 32101-32200 323 32201-32300 324 32301-32400 325 32401-32500 326 32501-32600 327 32601-32700 328 32701-32800 329 32801-32900 330 32901-33000 331 33001-33100 332 33101-33200 333 33201-33300 334 33301-33400 335 33401-33500 336 33501-33600 337 33601-33700 338 33701-33800 339 33801-33900 340 33901-34000 341 34001-34100 342 34101-34200 343 34201-34300 344 34301-34400 345 34401-34500 346 34501-34600 347 34601-34700 348 34701-34800 349 34801-34900 350 34901-35000 351 35001-35100 352 35101-35200 353 35201-35300 354 35301-35400 355 35401-35500 356 35501-35600 357 35601-35700 358 35701-35800 359 35801-35900 360 35901-36000 361 36001-36100 362 36101-36200 363 36201-36300 364 36301-36400 365 36401-36500 366 36501-36600 367 36601-36700 368 36701-36800 369 36801-36900 370 36901-37000 371 37001-37100 372 37101-37200 373 37201-37300 374 37301-37400 375 37401-37500 376 37501-37600 377 37601-37700 378 37701-37800 379 37801-37900 380 37901-38000 381 38001-38100 382 38101-38200 383 38201-38300 384 38301-38400 385 38401-38500 386 38501-38600 387 38601-38700 388 38701-38800 389 38801-38900 390 38901-39000 391 39001-39100 392 39101-39200 393 39201-39300 394 39301-39400 395 39401-39500 396 39501-39600 397 39601-39700 398 39701-39800 399 39801-39900 400 39901-40000 401 40001-40100 402 40101-40200 403 40201-40300 404 40301-40400 405 40401-40500 406 40501-40600 407 40601-40700 408 40701-40800 409 40801-40900 410 40901-41000 411 41001-41100 412 41101-41200 413 41201-41300 414 41301-41400 415 41401-41500 416 41501-41600 417 41601-41700 418 41701-41800 419 41801-41900 420 41901-42000 421 42001-42100 422 42101-42200 423 42201-42300 424 42301-42400 425 42401-42426
  Copyright terms: Public domain < Previous  Next >