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Theorem List for Metamath Proof Explorer - 11001-11100   *Has distinct variable group(s)
TypeLabelDescription
Statement
 
Theoremcju 11001* The complex conjugate of a complex number is unique. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 6-Nov-2013.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℂ → ∃!𝑥 ∈ ℂ ((𝐴 + 𝑥) ∈ ℝ ∧ (i · (𝐴𝑥)) ∈ ℝ))
 
5.3.10  Function operation analogue theorems
 
Theoremofsubeq0 11002 Function analogue of subeq0 10292. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 24-Jul-2014.)
((𝐴𝑉𝐹:𝐴⟶ℂ ∧ 𝐺:𝐴⟶ℂ) → ((𝐹𝑓𝐺) = (𝐴 × {0}) ↔ 𝐹 = 𝐺))
 
Theoremofnegsub 11003 Function analogue of negsub 10314. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 24-Jul-2014.)
((𝐴𝑉𝐹:𝐴⟶ℂ ∧ 𝐺:𝐴⟶ℂ) → (𝐹𝑓 + ((𝐴 × {-1}) ∘𝑓 · 𝐺)) = (𝐹𝑓𝐺))
 
Theoremofsubge0 11004 Function analogue of subge0 10526. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 24-Jul-2014.)
((𝐴𝑉𝐹:𝐴⟶ℝ ∧ 𝐺:𝐴⟶ℝ) → ((𝐴 × {0}) ∘𝑟 ≤ (𝐹𝑓𝐺) ↔ 𝐺𝑟𝐹))
 
5.4  Integer sets
 
5.4.1  Positive integers (as a subset of complex numbers)
 
Syntaxcn 11005 Extend class notation to include the class of positive integers.
class
 
Definitiondf-nn 11006 Define the set of positive integers. Some authors, especially in analysis books, call these the natural numbers, whereas other authors choose to include 0 in their definition of natural numbers. Note that is a subset of complex numbers (nnsscn 11010), in contrast to the more elementary ordinal natural numbers ω, df-om 7051). See nnind 11023 for the principle of mathematical induction. See df-n0 11278 for the set of nonnegative integers 0. See dfn2 11290 for defined in terms of 0.

This is a technical definition that helps us avoid the Axiom of Infinity ax-inf2 8523 in certain proofs. For a more conventional and intuitive definition ("the smallest set of reals containing 1 as well as the successor of every member") see dfnn3 11019 (or its slight variant dfnn2 11018). (Contributed by NM, 10-Jan-1997.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 3-May-2014.)

ℕ = (rec((𝑥 ∈ V ↦ (𝑥 + 1)), 1) “ ω)
 
TheoremnnexALT 11007 Alternate proof of nnex 11011, more direct, that makes use of ax-rep 4762. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 3-May-2014.) (Proof modification is discouraged.) (New usage is discouraged.)
ℕ ∈ V
 
Theorempeano5nni 11008* Peano's inductive postulate. Theorem I.36 (principle of mathematical induction) of [Apostol] p. 34. (Contributed by NM, 10-Jan-1997.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 17-Nov-2014.)
((1 ∈ 𝐴 ∧ ∀𝑥𝐴 (𝑥 + 1) ∈ 𝐴) → ℕ ⊆ 𝐴)
 
Theoremnnssre 11009 The positive integers are a subset of the reals. (Contributed by NM, 10-Jan-1997.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 16-Jun-2013.)
ℕ ⊆ ℝ
 
Theoremnnsscn 11010 The positive integers are a subset of the complex numbers. (Contributed by NM, 2-Aug-2004.)
ℕ ⊆ ℂ
 
Theoremnnex 11011 The set of positive integers exists. (Contributed by NM, 3-Oct-1999.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 17-Nov-2014.)
ℕ ∈ V
 
Theoremnnre 11012 A positive integer is a real number. (Contributed by NM, 18-Aug-1999.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℕ → 𝐴 ∈ ℝ)
 
Theoremnncn 11013 A positive integer is a complex number. (Contributed by NM, 18-Aug-1999.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℕ → 𝐴 ∈ ℂ)
 
Theoremnnrei 11014 A positive integer is a real number. (Contributed by NM, 18-Aug-1999.)
𝐴 ∈ ℕ       𝐴 ∈ ℝ
 
Theoremnncni 11015 A positive integer is a complex number. (Contributed by NM, 18-Aug-1999.)
𝐴 ∈ ℕ       𝐴 ∈ ℂ
 
Theorem1nn 11016 Peano postulate: 1 is a positive integer. (Contributed by NM, 11-Jan-1997.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 17-Nov-2014.)
1 ∈ ℕ
 
Theorempeano2nn 11017 Peano postulate: a successor of a positive integer is a positive integer. (Contributed by NM, 11-Jan-1997.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 17-Nov-2014.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℕ → (𝐴 + 1) ∈ ℕ)
 
Theoremdfnn2 11018* Alternate definition of the set of positive integers. This was our original definition, before the current df-nn 11006 replaced it. This definition requires the axiom of infinity to ensure it has the properties we expect. (Contributed by Jeff Hankins, 12-Sep-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 3-May-2014.)
ℕ = {𝑥 ∣ (1 ∈ 𝑥 ∧ ∀𝑦𝑥 (𝑦 + 1) ∈ 𝑥)}
 
Theoremdfnn3 11019* Alternate definition of the set of positive integers. Definition of positive integers in [Apostol] p. 22. (Contributed by NM, 3-Jul-2005.)
ℕ = {𝑥 ∣ (𝑥 ⊆ ℝ ∧ 1 ∈ 𝑥 ∧ ∀𝑦𝑥 (𝑦 + 1) ∈ 𝑥)}
 
Theoremnnred 11020 A positive integer is a real number. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 27-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℕ)       (𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℝ)
 
Theoremnncnd 11021 A positive integer is a complex number. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 27-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℕ)       (𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℂ)
 
Theorempeano2nnd 11022 Peano postulate: a successor of a positive integer is a positive integer. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 27-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℕ)       (𝜑 → (𝐴 + 1) ∈ ℕ)
 
5.4.2  Principle of mathematical induction
 
Theoremnnind 11023* Principle of Mathematical Induction (inference schema). The first four hypotheses give us the substitution instances we need; the last two are the basis and the induction step. See nnaddcl 11027 for an example of its use. See nn0ind 11457 for induction on nonnegative integers and uzind 11454, uzind4 11731 for induction on an arbitrary upper set of integers. See indstr 11741 for strong induction. See also nnindALT 11024. This is an alternative for Metamath 100 proof #74. (Contributed by NM, 10-Jan-1997.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 16-Jun-2013.)
(𝑥 = 1 → (𝜑𝜓))    &   (𝑥 = 𝑦 → (𝜑𝜒))    &   (𝑥 = (𝑦 + 1) → (𝜑𝜃))    &   (𝑥 = 𝐴 → (𝜑𝜏))    &   𝜓    &   (𝑦 ∈ ℕ → (𝜒𝜃))       (𝐴 ∈ ℕ → 𝜏)
 
TheoremnnindALT 11024* Principle of Mathematical Induction (inference schema). The last four hypotheses give us the substitution instances we need; the first two are the induction step and the basis.

This ALT version of nnind 11023 has a different hypothesis order. It may be easier to use with the metamath program's Proof Assistant, because "MM-PA> assign last" will be applied to the substitution instances first. We may eventually use this one as the official version. You may use either version. After the proof is complete, the ALT version can be changed to the non-ALT version with "MM-PA> minimize nnind /maygrow";. (Contributed by NM, 7-Dec-2005.) (New usage is discouraged.) (Proof modification is discouraged.)

(𝑦 ∈ ℕ → (𝜒𝜃))    &   𝜓    &   (𝑥 = 1 → (𝜑𝜓))    &   (𝑥 = 𝑦 → (𝜑𝜒))    &   (𝑥 = (𝑦 + 1) → (𝜑𝜃))    &   (𝑥 = 𝐴 → (𝜑𝜏))       (𝐴 ∈ ℕ → 𝜏)
 
Theoremnn1m1nn 11025 Every positive integer is one or a successor. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 16-May-2014.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℕ → (𝐴 = 1 ∨ (𝐴 − 1) ∈ ℕ))
 
Theoremnn1suc 11026* If a statement holds for 1 and also holds for a successor, it holds for all positive integers. The first three hypotheses give us the substitution instances we need; the last two show that it holds for 1 and for a successor. (Contributed by NM, 11-Oct-2004.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 16-May-2014.)
(𝑥 = 1 → (𝜑𝜓))    &   (𝑥 = (𝑦 + 1) → (𝜑𝜒))    &   (𝑥 = 𝐴 → (𝜑𝜃))    &   𝜓    &   (𝑦 ∈ ℕ → 𝜒)       (𝐴 ∈ ℕ → 𝜃)
 
Theoremnnaddcl 11027 Closure of addition of positive integers, proved by induction on the second addend. (Contributed by NM, 12-Jan-1997.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐵 ∈ ℕ) → (𝐴 + 𝐵) ∈ ℕ)
 
Theoremnnmulcl 11028 Closure of multiplication of positive integers. (Contributed by NM, 12-Jan-1997.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐵 ∈ ℕ) → (𝐴 · 𝐵) ∈ ℕ)
 
Theoremnnmulcli 11029 Closure of multiplication of positive integers. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 18-Feb-2014.)
𝐴 ∈ ℕ    &   𝐵 ∈ ℕ       (𝐴 · 𝐵) ∈ ℕ
 
Theoremnn2ge 11030* There exists a positive integer greater than or equal to any two others. (Contributed by NM, 18-Aug-1999.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐵 ∈ ℕ) → ∃𝑥 ∈ ℕ (𝐴𝑥𝐵𝑥))
 
Theoremnnge1 11031 A positive integer is one or greater. (Contributed by NM, 25-Aug-1999.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℕ → 1 ≤ 𝐴)
 
Theoremnngt1ne1 11032 A positive integer is greater than one iff it is not equal to one. (Contributed by NM, 7-Oct-2004.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℕ → (1 < 𝐴𝐴 ≠ 1))
 
Theoremnnle1eq1 11033 A positive integer is less than or equal to one iff it is equal to one. (Contributed by NM, 3-Apr-2005.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℕ → (𝐴 ≤ 1 ↔ 𝐴 = 1))
 
Theoremnngt0 11034 A positive integer is positive. (Contributed by NM, 26-Sep-1999.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℕ → 0 < 𝐴)
 
Theoremnnnlt1 11035 A positive integer is not less than one. (Contributed by NM, 18-Jan-2004.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 27-May-2016.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℕ → ¬ 𝐴 < 1)
 
Theoremnnnle0 11036 A positive integer is not less than or equal to zero . (Contributed by AV, 13-May-2020.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℕ → ¬ 𝐴 ≤ 0)
 
Theorem0nnn 11037 Zero is not a positive integer. (Contributed by NM, 25-Aug-1999.)
¬ 0 ∈ ℕ
 
Theoremnnne0 11038 A positive integer is nonzero. (Contributed by NM, 27-Sep-1999.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℕ → 𝐴 ≠ 0)
 
Theoremnngt0i 11039 A positive integer is positive (inference version). (Contributed by NM, 17-Sep-1999.)
𝐴 ∈ ℕ       0 < 𝐴
 
Theoremnnne0i 11040 A positive integer is nonzero (inference version). (Contributed by NM, 25-Aug-1999.)
𝐴 ∈ ℕ       𝐴 ≠ 0
 
Theoremnndivre 11041 The quotient of a real and a positive integer is real. (Contributed by NM, 28-Nov-2008.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℝ ∧ 𝑁 ∈ ℕ) → (𝐴 / 𝑁) ∈ ℝ)
 
Theoremnnrecre 11042 The reciprocal of a positive integer is real. (Contributed by NM, 8-Feb-2008.)
(𝑁 ∈ ℕ → (1 / 𝑁) ∈ ℝ)
 
Theoremnnrecgt0 11043 The reciprocal of a positive integer is positive. (Contributed by NM, 25-Aug-1999.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℕ → 0 < (1 / 𝐴))
 
Theoremnnsub 11044 Subtraction of positive integers. (Contributed by NM, 20-Aug-2001.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 16-May-2014.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐵 ∈ ℕ) → (𝐴 < 𝐵 ↔ (𝐵𝐴) ∈ ℕ))
 
Theoremnnsubi 11045 Subtraction of positive integers. (Contributed by NM, 19-Aug-2001.)
𝐴 ∈ ℕ    &   𝐵 ∈ ℕ       (𝐴 < 𝐵 ↔ (𝐵𝐴) ∈ ℕ)
 
Theoremnndiv 11046* Two ways to express "𝐴 divides 𝐵 " for positive integers. (Contributed by NM, 3-Feb-2004.) (Proof shortened by Mario Carneiro, 16-May-2014.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐵 ∈ ℕ) → (∃𝑥 ∈ ℕ (𝐴 · 𝑥) = 𝐵 ↔ (𝐵 / 𝐴) ∈ ℕ))
 
Theoremnndivtr 11047 Transitive property of divisibility: if 𝐴 divides 𝐵 and 𝐵 divides 𝐶, then 𝐴 divides 𝐶. Typically, 𝐶 would be an integer, although the theorem holds for complex 𝐶. (Contributed by NM, 3-May-2005.)
(((𝐴 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐵 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝐶 ∈ ℂ) ∧ ((𝐵 / 𝐴) ∈ ℕ ∧ (𝐶 / 𝐵) ∈ ℕ)) → (𝐶 / 𝐴) ∈ ℕ)
 
Theoremnnge1d 11048 A positive integer is one or greater. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 27-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℕ)       (𝜑 → 1 ≤ 𝐴)
 
Theoremnngt0d 11049 A positive integer is positive. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 27-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℕ)       (𝜑 → 0 < 𝐴)
 
Theoremnnne0d 11050 A positive integer is nonzero. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 27-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℕ)       (𝜑𝐴 ≠ 0)
 
Theoremnnrecred 11051 The reciprocal of a positive integer is real. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 27-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℕ)       (𝜑 → (1 / 𝐴) ∈ ℝ)
 
Theoremnnaddcld 11052 Closure of addition of positive integers. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 27-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℕ)    &   (𝜑𝐵 ∈ ℕ)       (𝜑 → (𝐴 + 𝐵) ∈ ℕ)
 
Theoremnnmulcld 11053 Closure of multiplication of positive integers. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 27-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℕ)    &   (𝜑𝐵 ∈ ℕ)       (𝜑 → (𝐴 · 𝐵) ∈ ℕ)
 
Theoremnndivred 11054 A positive integer is one or greater. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 27-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℝ)    &   (𝜑𝐵 ∈ ℕ)       (𝜑 → (𝐴 / 𝐵) ∈ ℝ)
 
5.4.3  Decimal representation of numbers

The decimal representation of numbers/integers is based on the decimal digits 0 through 9 (df-0 9928 through df-9 11071), which are explicitly defined in the following. Note that the numbers 0 and 1 are constants defined as primitives of the complex number axiom system (see df-0 9928 and df-1 9929).

With the decimal constructor df-dec 11479, it is possible to easily express larger integers in base 10. See deccl 11497 and the theorems that follow it. See also 4001prm 15833 (4001 is prime) and the proof of bpos 24999. Note that the decimal constructor builds on the definitions in this section.

Note: The symbol 10 representing the number 10 is deprecated (and will be removed in the near future). The number 10 should be represented by its digits using the decimal constructor only, i.e. by 10. Therefore, only decimal digits are needed (as symbols) for the decimal representation of a number.

Integers can also be exhibited as sums of powers of 10 (e.g. the number 103 can be expressed as ((10↑2) + 3)) or as some other expression built from operations on the numbers 0 through 9. For example, the prime number 823541 can be expressed as (7↑7) − 2. Decimals can be expressed as ratios of integers, as in cos2bnd 14899.

Most abstract math rarely requires numbers larger than 4. Even in Wiles' proof of Fermat's Last Theorem, the largest number used appears to be 12.

 
Syntaxc2 11055 Extend class notation to include the number 2.
class 2
 
Syntaxc3 11056 Extend class notation to include the number 3.
class 3
 
Syntaxc4 11057 Extend class notation to include the number 4.
class 4
 
Syntaxc5 11058 Extend class notation to include the number 5.
class 5
 
Syntaxc6 11059 Extend class notation to include the number 6.
class 6
 
Syntaxc7 11060 Extend class notation to include the number 7.
class 7
 
Syntaxc8 11061 Extend class notation to include the number 8.
class 8
 
Syntaxc9 11062 Extend class notation to include the number 9.
class 9
 
Syntaxc10 11063 Extend class notation to include the number 10.
class 10
 
Definitiondf-2 11064 Define the number 2. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1999.)
2 = (1 + 1)
 
Definitiondf-3 11065 Define the number 3. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1999.)
3 = (2 + 1)
 
Definitiondf-4 11066 Define the number 4. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1999.)
4 = (3 + 1)
 
Definitiondf-5 11067 Define the number 5. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1999.)
5 = (4 + 1)
 
Definitiondf-6 11068 Define the number 6. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1999.)
6 = (5 + 1)
 
Definitiondf-7 11069 Define the number 7. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1999.)
7 = (6 + 1)
 
Definitiondf-8 11070 Define the number 8. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1999.)
8 = (7 + 1)
 
Definitiondf-9 11071 Define the number 9. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1999.)
9 = (8 + 1)
 
Definitiondf-10OLD 11072 Define the number 10. See remarks under df-2 11064. (Contributed by NM, 5-Feb-2007.) Obsolete as of 9-Sep-2021. (New usage is discouraged.)
10 = (9 + 1)
 
Theorem0ne1 11073 0 ≠ 1 (common case); the reverse order is already proved. (Contributed by David A. Wheeler, 8-Dec-2018.)
0 ≠ 1
 
Theorem1m1e0 11074 (1 − 1) = 0 (common case). (Contributed by David A. Wheeler, 7-Jul-2016.)
(1 − 1) = 0
 
Theorem2re 11075 The number 2 is real. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1999.)
2 ∈ ℝ
 
Theorem2cn 11076 The number 2 is a complex number. (Contributed by NM, 30-Jul-2004.)
2 ∈ ℂ
 
Theorem2ex 11077 2 is a set (common case). (Contributed by David A. Wheeler, 8-Dec-2018.)
2 ∈ V
 
Theorem2cnd 11078 2 is a complex number, deductive form (common case). (Contributed by David A. Wheeler, 8-Dec-2018.)
(𝜑 → 2 ∈ ℂ)
 
Theorem3re 11079 The number 3 is real. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1999.)
3 ∈ ℝ
 
Theorem3cn 11080 The number 3 is a complex number. (Contributed by FL, 17-Oct-2010.)
3 ∈ ℂ
 
Theorem3ex 11081 3 is a set (common case). (Contributed by David A. Wheeler, 8-Dec-2018.)
3 ∈ V
 
Theorem4re 11082 The number 4 is real. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1999.)
4 ∈ ℝ
 
Theorem4cn 11083 The number 4 is a complex number. (Contributed by David A. Wheeler, 7-Jul-2016.)
4 ∈ ℂ
 
Theorem5re 11084 The number 5 is real. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1999.)
5 ∈ ℝ
 
Theorem5cn 11085 The number 5 is complex. (Contributed by David A. Wheeler, 8-Dec-2018.)
5 ∈ ℂ
 
Theorem6re 11086 The number 6 is real. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1999.)
6 ∈ ℝ
 
Theorem6cn 11087 The number 6 is complex. (Contributed by David A. Wheeler, 8-Dec-2018.)
6 ∈ ℂ
 
Theorem7re 11088 The number 7 is real. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1999.)
7 ∈ ℝ
 
Theorem7cn 11089 The number 7 is complex. (Contributed by David A. Wheeler, 8-Dec-2018.)
7 ∈ ℂ
 
Theorem8re 11090 The number 8 is real. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1999.)
8 ∈ ℝ
 
Theorem8cn 11091 The number 8 is complex. (Contributed by David A. Wheeler, 8-Dec-2018.)
8 ∈ ℂ
 
Theorem9re 11092 The number 9 is real. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1999.)
9 ∈ ℝ
 
Theorem9cn 11093 The number 9 is complex. (Contributed by David A. Wheeler, 8-Dec-2018.)
9 ∈ ℂ
 
Theorem10reOLD 11094 Obsolete version of 10re 11502 as of 8-Sep-2021. (Contributed by NM, 5-Feb-2007.) (New usage is discouraged.) (Proof modification is discouraged.)
10 ∈ ℝ
 
Theorem0le0 11095 Zero is nonnegative. (Contributed by David A. Wheeler, 7-Jul-2016.)
0 ≤ 0
 
Theorem0le2 11096 0 is less than or equal to 2. (Contributed by David A. Wheeler, 7-Dec-2018.)
0 ≤ 2
 
Theorem2pos 11097 The number 2 is positive. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1999.)
0 < 2
 
Theorem2ne0 11098 The number 2 is nonzero. (Contributed by NM, 9-Nov-2007.)
2 ≠ 0
 
Theorem3pos 11099 The number 3 is positive. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1999.)
0 < 3
 
Theorem3ne0 11100 The number 3 is nonzero. (Contributed by FL, 17-Oct-2010.) (Proof shortened by Andrew Salmon, 7-May-2011.)
3 ≠ 0
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