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Theorem List for Intuitionistic Logic Explorer - 6601-6700   *Has distinct variable group(s)
TypeLabelDescription
Statement
 
Theoremixpconstg 6601* Infinite Cartesian product of a constant 𝐵. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 11-Jan-2015.)
((𝐴𝑉𝐵𝑊) → X𝑥𝐴 𝐵 = (𝐵𝑚 𝐴))
 
Theoremixpconst 6602* Infinite Cartesian product of a constant 𝐵. (Contributed by NM, 28-Sep-2006.)
𝐴 ∈ V    &   𝐵 ∈ V       X𝑥𝐴 𝐵 = (𝐵𝑚 𝐴)
 
Theoremixpeq1 6603* Equality theorem for infinite Cartesian product. (Contributed by NM, 29-Sep-2006.)
(𝐴 = 𝐵X𝑥𝐴 𝐶 = X𝑥𝐵 𝐶)
 
Theoremixpeq1d 6604* Equality theorem for infinite Cartesian product. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 11-Jun-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 = 𝐵)       (𝜑X𝑥𝐴 𝐶 = X𝑥𝐵 𝐶)
 
Theoremss2ixp 6605 Subclass theorem for infinite Cartesian product. (Contributed by NM, 29-Sep-2006.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 12-Aug-2016.)
(∀𝑥𝐴 𝐵𝐶X𝑥𝐴 𝐵X𝑥𝐴 𝐶)
 
Theoremixpeq2 6606 Equality theorem for infinite Cartesian product. (Contributed by NM, 29-Sep-2006.)
(∀𝑥𝐴 𝐵 = 𝐶X𝑥𝐴 𝐵 = X𝑥𝐴 𝐶)
 
Theoremixpeq2dva 6607* Equality theorem for infinite Cartesian product. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 11-Jun-2016.)
((𝜑𝑥𝐴) → 𝐵 = 𝐶)       (𝜑X𝑥𝐴 𝐵 = X𝑥𝐴 𝐶)
 
Theoremixpeq2dv 6608* Equality theorem for infinite Cartesian product. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 11-Jun-2016.)
(𝜑𝐵 = 𝐶)       (𝜑X𝑥𝐴 𝐵 = X𝑥𝐴 𝐶)
 
Theoremcbvixp 6609* Change bound variable in an indexed Cartesian product. (Contributed by Jeff Madsen, 20-Jun-2011.)
𝑦𝐵    &   𝑥𝐶    &   (𝑥 = 𝑦𝐵 = 𝐶)       X𝑥𝐴 𝐵 = X𝑦𝐴 𝐶
 
Theoremcbvixpv 6610* Change bound variable in an indexed Cartesian product. (Contributed by Jeff Madsen, 2-Sep-2009.)
(𝑥 = 𝑦𝐵 = 𝐶)       X𝑥𝐴 𝐵 = X𝑦𝐴 𝐶
 
Theoremnfixpxy 6611* Bound-variable hypothesis builder for indexed Cartesian product. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 15-Oct-2016.) (Revised by Jim Kingdon, 15-Feb-2023.)
𝑦𝐴    &   𝑦𝐵       𝑦X𝑥𝐴 𝐵
 
Theoremnfixp1 6612 The index variable in an indexed Cartesian product is not free. (Contributed by Jeff Madsen, 19-Jun-2011.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 15-Oct-2016.)
𝑥X𝑥𝐴 𝐵
 
Theoremixpprc 6613* A cartesian product of proper-class many sets is empty, because any function in the cartesian product has to be a set with domain 𝐴, which is not possible for a proper class domain. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 25-Jan-2015.)
𝐴 ∈ V → X𝑥𝐴 𝐵 = ∅)
 
Theoremixpf 6614* A member of an infinite Cartesian product maps to the indexed union of the product argument. Remark in [Enderton] p. 54. (Contributed by NM, 28-Sep-2006.)
(𝐹X𝑥𝐴 𝐵𝐹:𝐴 𝑥𝐴 𝐵)
 
Theoremuniixp 6615* The union of an infinite Cartesian product is included in a Cartesian product. (Contributed by NM, 28-Sep-2006.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 24-Jun-2015.)
X𝑥𝐴 𝐵 ⊆ (𝐴 × 𝑥𝐴 𝐵)
 
Theoremixpexgg 6616* The existence of an infinite Cartesian product. 𝑥 is normally a free-variable parameter in 𝐵. Remark in Enderton p. 54. (Contributed by NM, 28-Sep-2006.) (Revised by Jim Kingdon, 15-Feb-2023.)
((𝐴𝑊 ∧ ∀𝑥𝐴 𝐵𝑉) → X𝑥𝐴 𝐵 ∈ V)
 
Theoremixpin 6617* The intersection of two infinite Cartesian products. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 3-Feb-2015.)
X𝑥𝐴 (𝐵𝐶) = (X𝑥𝐴 𝐵X𝑥𝐴 𝐶)
 
Theoremixpiinm 6618* The indexed intersection of a collection of infinite Cartesian products. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 6-Feb-2015.) (Revised by Jim Kingdon, 15-Feb-2023.)
(∃𝑧 𝑧𝐵X𝑥𝐴 𝑦𝐵 𝐶 = 𝑦𝐵 X𝑥𝐴 𝐶)
 
Theoremixpintm 6619* The intersection of a collection of infinite Cartesian products. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 3-Feb-2015.) (Revised by Jim Kingdon, 15-Feb-2023.)
(∃𝑧 𝑧𝐵X𝑥𝐴 𝐵 = 𝑦𝐵 X𝑥𝐴 𝑦)
 
Theoremixp0x 6620 An infinite Cartesian product with an empty index set. (Contributed by NM, 21-Sep-2007.)
X𝑥 ∈ ∅ 𝐴 = {∅}
 
Theoremixpssmap2g 6621* An infinite Cartesian product is a subset of set exponentiation. This version of ixpssmapg 6622 avoids ax-coll 4043. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 16-Nov-2014.)
( 𝑥𝐴 𝐵𝑉X𝑥𝐴 𝐵 ⊆ ( 𝑥𝐴 𝐵𝑚 𝐴))
 
Theoremixpssmapg 6622* An infinite Cartesian product is a subset of set exponentiation. (Contributed by Jeff Madsen, 19-Jun-2011.)
(∀𝑥𝐴 𝐵𝑉X𝑥𝐴 𝐵 ⊆ ( 𝑥𝐴 𝐵𝑚 𝐴))
 
Theorem0elixp 6623 Membership of the empty set in an infinite Cartesian product. (Contributed by Steve Rodriguez, 29-Sep-2006.)
∅ ∈ X𝑥 ∈ ∅ 𝐴
 
Theoremixpm 6624* If an infinite Cartesian product of a family 𝐵(𝑥) is inhabited, every 𝐵(𝑥) is inhabited. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 22-Jun-2016.) (Revised by Jim Kingdon, 16-Feb-2023.)
(∃𝑓 𝑓X𝑥𝐴 𝐵 → ∀𝑥𝐴𝑧 𝑧𝐵)
 
Theoremixp0 6625 The infinite Cartesian product of a family 𝐵(𝑥) with an empty member is empty. (Contributed by NM, 1-Oct-2006.) (Revised by Jim Kingdon, 16-Feb-2023.)
(∃𝑥𝐴 𝐵 = ∅ → X𝑥𝐴 𝐵 = ∅)
 
Theoremixpssmap 6626* An infinite Cartesian product is a subset of set exponentiation. Remark in [Enderton] p. 54. (Contributed by NM, 28-Sep-2006.)
𝐵 ∈ V       X𝑥𝐴 𝐵 ⊆ ( 𝑥𝐴 𝐵𝑚 𝐴)
 
Theoremresixp 6627* Restriction of an element of an infinite Cartesian product. (Contributed by FL, 7-Nov-2011.) (Proof shortened by Mario Carneiro, 31-May-2014.)
((𝐵𝐴𝐹X𝑥𝐴 𝐶) → (𝐹𝐵) ∈ X𝑥𝐵 𝐶)
 
Theoremmptelixpg 6628* Condition for an explicit member of an indexed product. (Contributed by Stefan O'Rear, 4-Jan-2015.)
(𝐼𝑉 → ((𝑥𝐼𝐽) ∈ X𝑥𝐼 𝐾 ↔ ∀𝑥𝐼 𝐽𝐾))
 
Theoremelixpsn 6629* Membership in a class of singleton functions. (Contributed by Stefan O'Rear, 24-Jan-2015.)
(𝐴𝑉 → (𝐹X𝑥 ∈ {𝐴}𝐵 ↔ ∃𝑦𝐵 𝐹 = {⟨𝐴, 𝑦⟩}))
 
Theoremixpsnf1o 6630* A bijection between a class and single-point functions to it. (Contributed by Stefan O'Rear, 24-Jan-2015.)
𝐹 = (𝑥𝐴 ↦ ({𝐼} × {𝑥}))       (𝐼𝑉𝐹:𝐴1-1-ontoX𝑦 ∈ {𝐼}𝐴)
 
Theoremmapsnf1o 6631* A bijection between a set and single-point functions to it. (Contributed by Stefan O'Rear, 24-Jan-2015.)
𝐹 = (𝑥𝐴 ↦ ({𝐼} × {𝑥}))       ((𝐴𝑉𝐼𝑊) → 𝐹:𝐴1-1-onto→(𝐴𝑚 {𝐼}))
 
2.6.27  Equinumerosity
 
Syntaxcen 6632 Extend class definition to include the equinumerosity relation ("approximately equals" symbol)
class
 
Syntaxcdom 6633 Extend class definition to include the dominance relation (curly less-than-or-equal)
class
 
Syntaxcfn 6634 Extend class definition to include the class of all finite sets.
class Fin
 
Definitiondf-en 6635* Define the equinumerosity relation. Definition of [Enderton] p. 129. We define to be a binary relation rather than a connective, so its arguments must be sets to be meaningful. This is acceptable because we do not consider equinumerosity for proper classes. We derive the usual definition as bren 6641. (Contributed by NM, 28-Mar-1998.)
≈ = {⟨𝑥, 𝑦⟩ ∣ ∃𝑓 𝑓:𝑥1-1-onto𝑦}
 
Definitiondf-dom 6636* Define the dominance relation. Compare Definition of [Enderton] p. 145. Typical textbook definitions are derived as brdom 6644 and domen 6645. (Contributed by NM, 28-Mar-1998.)
≼ = {⟨𝑥, 𝑦⟩ ∣ ∃𝑓 𝑓:𝑥1-1𝑦}
 
Definitiondf-fin 6637* Define the (proper) class of all finite sets. Similar to Definition 10.29 of [TakeutiZaring] p. 91, whose "Fin(a)" corresponds to our "𝑎 ∈ Fin". This definition is meaningful whether or not we accept the Axiom of Infinity ax-inf2 13233. (Contributed by NM, 22-Aug-2008.)
Fin = {𝑥 ∣ ∃𝑦 ∈ ω 𝑥𝑦}
 
Theoremrelen 6638 Equinumerosity is a relation. (Contributed by NM, 28-Mar-1998.)
Rel ≈
 
Theoremreldom 6639 Dominance is a relation. (Contributed by NM, 28-Mar-1998.)
Rel ≼
 
Theoremencv 6640 If two classes are equinumerous, both classes are sets. (Contributed by AV, 21-Mar-2019.)
(𝐴𝐵 → (𝐴 ∈ V ∧ 𝐵 ∈ V))
 
Theorembren 6641* Equinumerosity relation. (Contributed by NM, 15-Jun-1998.)
(𝐴𝐵 ↔ ∃𝑓 𝑓:𝐴1-1-onto𝐵)
 
Theorembrdomg 6642* Dominance relation. (Contributed by NM, 15-Jun-1998.)
(𝐵𝐶 → (𝐴𝐵 ↔ ∃𝑓 𝑓:𝐴1-1𝐵))
 
Theorembrdomi 6643* Dominance relation. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 26-Apr-2015.)
(𝐴𝐵 → ∃𝑓 𝑓:𝐴1-1𝐵)
 
Theorembrdom 6644* Dominance relation. (Contributed by NM, 15-Jun-1998.)
𝐵 ∈ V       (𝐴𝐵 ↔ ∃𝑓 𝑓:𝐴1-1𝐵)
 
Theoremdomen 6645* Dominance in terms of equinumerosity. Example 1 of [Enderton] p. 146. (Contributed by NM, 15-Jun-1998.)
𝐵 ∈ V       (𝐴𝐵 ↔ ∃𝑥(𝐴𝑥𝑥𝐵))
 
Theoremdomeng 6646* Dominance in terms of equinumerosity, with the sethood requirement expressed as an antecedent. Example 1 of [Enderton] p. 146. (Contributed by NM, 24-Apr-2004.)
(𝐵𝐶 → (𝐴𝐵 ↔ ∃𝑥(𝐴𝑥𝑥𝐵)))
 
Theoremctex 6647 A class dominated by ω is a set. See also ctfoex 7003 which says that a countable class is a set. (Contributed by Thierry Arnoux, 29-Dec-2016.) (Proof shortened by Jim Kingdon, 13-Mar-2023.)
(𝐴 ≼ ω → 𝐴 ∈ V)
 
Theoremf1oen3g 6648 The domain and range of a one-to-one, onto function are equinumerous. This variation of f1oeng 6651 does not require the Axiom of Replacement. (Contributed by NM, 13-Jan-2007.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 10-Sep-2015.)
((𝐹𝑉𝐹:𝐴1-1-onto𝐵) → 𝐴𝐵)
 
Theoremf1oen2g 6649 The domain and range of a one-to-one, onto function are equinumerous. This variation of f1oeng 6651 does not require the Axiom of Replacement. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 10-Sep-2015.)
((𝐴𝑉𝐵𝑊𝐹:𝐴1-1-onto𝐵) → 𝐴𝐵)
 
Theoremf1dom2g 6650 The domain of a one-to-one function is dominated by its codomain. This variation of f1domg 6652 does not require the Axiom of Replacement. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 24-Jun-2015.)
((𝐴𝑉𝐵𝑊𝐹:𝐴1-1𝐵) → 𝐴𝐵)
 
Theoremf1oeng 6651 The domain and range of a one-to-one, onto function are equinumerous. (Contributed by NM, 19-Jun-1998.)
((𝐴𝐶𝐹:𝐴1-1-onto𝐵) → 𝐴𝐵)
 
Theoremf1domg 6652 The domain of a one-to-one function is dominated by its codomain. (Contributed by NM, 4-Sep-2004.)
(𝐵𝐶 → (𝐹:𝐴1-1𝐵𝐴𝐵))
 
Theoremf1oen 6653 The domain and range of a one-to-one, onto function are equinumerous. (Contributed by NM, 19-Jun-1998.)
𝐴 ∈ V       (𝐹:𝐴1-1-onto𝐵𝐴𝐵)
 
Theoremf1dom 6654 The domain of a one-to-one function is dominated by its codomain. (Contributed by NM, 19-Jun-1998.)
𝐵 ∈ V       (𝐹:𝐴1-1𝐵𝐴𝐵)
 
Theoremisfi 6655* Express "𝐴 is finite." Definition 10.29 of [TakeutiZaring] p. 91 (whose "Fin " is a predicate instead of a class). (Contributed by NM, 22-Aug-2008.)
(𝐴 ∈ Fin ↔ ∃𝑥 ∈ ω 𝐴𝑥)
 
Theoremenssdom 6656 Equinumerosity implies dominance. (Contributed by NM, 31-Mar-1998.)
≈ ⊆ ≼
 
Theoremendom 6657 Equinumerosity implies dominance. Theorem 15 of [Suppes] p. 94. (Contributed by NM, 28-May-1998.)
(𝐴𝐵𝐴𝐵)
 
Theoremenrefg 6658 Equinumerosity is reflexive. Theorem 1 of [Suppes] p. 92. (Contributed by NM, 18-Jun-1998.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 26-Apr-2015.)
(𝐴𝑉𝐴𝐴)
 
Theoremenref 6659 Equinumerosity is reflexive. Theorem 1 of [Suppes] p. 92. (Contributed by NM, 25-Sep-2004.)
𝐴 ∈ V       𝐴𝐴
 
Theoremeqeng 6660 Equality implies equinumerosity. (Contributed by NM, 26-Oct-2003.)
(𝐴𝑉 → (𝐴 = 𝐵𝐴𝐵))
 
Theoremdomrefg 6661 Dominance is reflexive. (Contributed by NM, 18-Jun-1998.)
(𝐴𝑉𝐴𝐴)
 
Theoremen2d 6662* Equinumerosity inference from an implicit one-to-one onto function. (Contributed by NM, 27-Jul-2004.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 12-May-2014.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ V)    &   (𝜑𝐵 ∈ V)    &   (𝜑 → (𝑥𝐴𝐶 ∈ V))    &   (𝜑 → (𝑦𝐵𝐷 ∈ V))    &   (𝜑 → ((𝑥𝐴𝑦 = 𝐶) ↔ (𝑦𝐵𝑥 = 𝐷)))       (𝜑𝐴𝐵)
 
Theoremen3d 6663* Equinumerosity inference from an implicit one-to-one onto function. (Contributed by NM, 27-Jul-2004.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 12-May-2014.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ V)    &   (𝜑𝐵 ∈ V)    &   (𝜑 → (𝑥𝐴𝐶𝐵))    &   (𝜑 → (𝑦𝐵𝐷𝐴))    &   (𝜑 → ((𝑥𝐴𝑦𝐵) → (𝑥 = 𝐷𝑦 = 𝐶)))       (𝜑𝐴𝐵)
 
Theoremen2i 6664* Equinumerosity inference from an implicit one-to-one onto function. (Contributed by NM, 4-Jan-2004.)
𝐴 ∈ V    &   𝐵 ∈ V    &   (𝑥𝐴𝐶 ∈ V)    &   (𝑦𝐵𝐷 ∈ V)    &   ((𝑥𝐴𝑦 = 𝐶) ↔ (𝑦𝐵𝑥 = 𝐷))       𝐴𝐵
 
Theoremen3i 6665* Equinumerosity inference from an implicit one-to-one onto function. (Contributed by NM, 19-Jul-2004.)
𝐴 ∈ V    &   𝐵 ∈ V    &   (𝑥𝐴𝐶𝐵)    &   (𝑦𝐵𝐷𝐴)    &   ((𝑥𝐴𝑦𝐵) → (𝑥 = 𝐷𝑦 = 𝐶))       𝐴𝐵
 
Theoremdom2lem 6666* A mapping (first hypothesis) that is one-to-one (second hypothesis) implies its domain is dominated by its codomain. (Contributed by NM, 24-Jul-2004.)
(𝜑 → (𝑥𝐴𝐶𝐵))    &   (𝜑 → ((𝑥𝐴𝑦𝐴) → (𝐶 = 𝐷𝑥 = 𝑦)))       (𝜑 → (𝑥𝐴𝐶):𝐴1-1𝐵)
 
Theoremdom2d 6667* A mapping (first hypothesis) that is one-to-one (second hypothesis) implies its domain is dominated by its codomain. (Contributed by NM, 24-Jul-2004.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 20-May-2013.)
(𝜑 → (𝑥𝐴𝐶𝐵))    &   (𝜑 → ((𝑥𝐴𝑦𝐴) → (𝐶 = 𝐷𝑥 = 𝑦)))       (𝜑 → (𝐵𝑅𝐴𝐵))
 
Theoremdom3d 6668* A mapping (first hypothesis) that is one-to-one (second hypothesis) implies its domain is dominated by its codomain. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 20-May-2013.)
(𝜑 → (𝑥𝐴𝐶𝐵))    &   (𝜑 → ((𝑥𝐴𝑦𝐴) → (𝐶 = 𝐷𝑥 = 𝑦)))    &   (𝜑𝐴𝑉)    &   (𝜑𝐵𝑊)       (𝜑𝐴𝐵)
 
Theoremdom2 6669* A mapping (first hypothesis) that is one-to-one (second hypothesis) implies its domain is dominated by its codomain. 𝐶 and 𝐷 can be read 𝐶(𝑥) and 𝐷(𝑦), as can be inferred from their distinct variable conditions. (Contributed by NM, 26-Oct-2003.)
(𝑥𝐴𝐶𝐵)    &   ((𝑥𝐴𝑦𝐴) → (𝐶 = 𝐷𝑥 = 𝑦))       (𝐵𝑉𝐴𝐵)
 
Theoremdom3 6670* A mapping (first hypothesis) that is one-to-one (second hypothesis) implies its domain is dominated by its codomain. 𝐶 and 𝐷 can be read 𝐶(𝑥) and 𝐷(𝑦), as can be inferred from their distinct variable conditions. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 20-May-2013.)
(𝑥𝐴𝐶𝐵)    &   ((𝑥𝐴𝑦𝐴) → (𝐶 = 𝐷𝑥 = 𝑦))       ((𝐴𝑉𝐵𝑊) → 𝐴𝐵)
 
Theoremidssen 6671 Equality implies equinumerosity. (Contributed by NM, 30-Apr-1998.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 15-Nov-2014.)
I ⊆ ≈
 
Theoremssdomg 6672 A set dominates its subsets. Theorem 16 of [Suppes] p. 94. (Contributed by NM, 19-Jun-1998.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 24-Jun-2015.)
(𝐵𝑉 → (𝐴𝐵𝐴𝐵))
 
Theoremener 6673 Equinumerosity is an equivalence relation. (Contributed by NM, 19-Mar-1998.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 15-Nov-2014.)
≈ Er V
 
Theoremensymb 6674 Symmetry of equinumerosity. Theorem 2 of [Suppes] p. 92. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 26-Apr-2015.)
(𝐴𝐵𝐵𝐴)
 
Theoremensym 6675 Symmetry of equinumerosity. Theorem 2 of [Suppes] p. 92. (Contributed by NM, 26-Oct-2003.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 26-Apr-2015.)
(𝐴𝐵𝐵𝐴)
 
Theoremensymi 6676 Symmetry of equinumerosity. Theorem 2 of [Suppes] p. 92. (Contributed by NM, 25-Sep-2004.)
𝐴𝐵       𝐵𝐴
 
Theoremensymd 6677 Symmetry of equinumerosity. Deduction form of ensym 6675. (Contributed by David Moews, 1-May-2017.)
(𝜑𝐴𝐵)       (𝜑𝐵𝐴)
 
Theorementr 6678 Transitivity of equinumerosity. Theorem 3 of [Suppes] p. 92. (Contributed by NM, 9-Jun-1998.)
((𝐴𝐵𝐵𝐶) → 𝐴𝐶)
 
Theoremdomtr 6679 Transitivity of dominance relation. Theorem 17 of [Suppes] p. 94. (Contributed by NM, 4-Jun-1998.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 15-Nov-2014.)
((𝐴𝐵𝐵𝐶) → 𝐴𝐶)
 
Theorementri 6680 A chained equinumerosity inference. (Contributed by NM, 25-Sep-2004.)
𝐴𝐵    &   𝐵𝐶       𝐴𝐶
 
Theorementr2i 6681 A chained equinumerosity inference. (Contributed by NM, 25-Sep-2004.)
𝐴𝐵    &   𝐵𝐶       𝐶𝐴
 
Theorementr3i 6682 A chained equinumerosity inference. (Contributed by NM, 25-Sep-2004.)
𝐴𝐵    &   𝐴𝐶       𝐵𝐶
 
Theorementr4i 6683 A chained equinumerosity inference. (Contributed by NM, 25-Sep-2004.)
𝐴𝐵    &   𝐶𝐵       𝐴𝐶
 
Theoremendomtr 6684 Transitivity of equinumerosity and dominance. (Contributed by NM, 7-Jun-1998.)
((𝐴𝐵𝐵𝐶) → 𝐴𝐶)
 
Theoremdomentr 6685 Transitivity of dominance and equinumerosity. (Contributed by NM, 7-Jun-1998.)
((𝐴𝐵𝐵𝐶) → 𝐴𝐶)
 
Theoremf1imaeng 6686 A one-to-one function's image under a subset of its domain is equinumerous to the subset. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 15-May-2015.)
((𝐹:𝐴1-1𝐵𝐶𝐴𝐶𝑉) → (𝐹𝐶) ≈ 𝐶)
 
Theoremf1imaen2g 6687 A one-to-one function's image under a subset of its domain is equinumerous to the subset. (This version of f1imaen 6688 does not need ax-setind 4452.) (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 16-Nov-2014.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 25-Jun-2015.)
(((𝐹:𝐴1-1𝐵𝐵𝑉) ∧ (𝐶𝐴𝐶𝑉)) → (𝐹𝐶) ≈ 𝐶)
 
Theoremf1imaen 6688 A one-to-one function's image under a subset of its domain is equinumerous to the subset. (Contributed by NM, 30-Sep-2004.)
𝐶 ∈ V       ((𝐹:𝐴1-1𝐵𝐶𝐴) → (𝐹𝐶) ≈ 𝐶)
 
Theoremen0 6689 The empty set is equinumerous only to itself. Exercise 1 of [TakeutiZaring] p. 88. (Contributed by NM, 27-May-1998.)
(𝐴 ≈ ∅ ↔ 𝐴 = ∅)
 
Theoremensn1 6690 A singleton is equinumerous to ordinal one. (Contributed by NM, 4-Nov-2002.)
𝐴 ∈ V       {𝐴} ≈ 1o
 
Theoremensn1g 6691 A singleton is equinumerous to ordinal one. (Contributed by NM, 23-Apr-2004.)
(𝐴𝑉 → {𝐴} ≈ 1o)
 
Theoremenpr1g 6692 {𝐴, 𝐴} has only one element. (Contributed by FL, 15-Feb-2010.)
(𝐴𝑉 → {𝐴, 𝐴} ≈ 1o)
 
Theoremen1 6693* A set is equinumerous to ordinal one iff it is a singleton. (Contributed by NM, 25-Jul-2004.)
(𝐴 ≈ 1o ↔ ∃𝑥 𝐴 = {𝑥})
 
Theoremen1bg 6694 A set is equinumerous to ordinal one iff it is a singleton. (Contributed by Jim Kingdon, 13-Apr-2020.)
(𝐴𝑉 → (𝐴 ≈ 1o𝐴 = { 𝐴}))
 
Theoremreuen1 6695* Two ways to express "exactly one". (Contributed by Stefan O'Rear, 28-Oct-2014.)
(∃!𝑥𝐴 𝜑 ↔ {𝑥𝐴𝜑} ≈ 1o)
 
Theoremeuen1 6696 Two ways to express "exactly one". (Contributed by Stefan O'Rear, 28-Oct-2014.)
(∃!𝑥𝜑 ↔ {𝑥𝜑} ≈ 1o)
 
Theoremeuen1b 6697* Two ways to express "𝐴 has a unique element". (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 9-Apr-2015.)
(𝐴 ≈ 1o ↔ ∃!𝑥 𝑥𝐴)
 
Theoremen1uniel 6698 A singleton contains its sole element. (Contributed by Stefan O'Rear, 16-Aug-2015.)
(𝑆 ≈ 1o 𝑆𝑆)
 
Theorem2dom 6699* A set that dominates ordinal 2 has at least 2 different members. (Contributed by NM, 25-Jul-2004.)
(2o𝐴 → ∃𝑥𝐴𝑦𝐴 ¬ 𝑥 = 𝑦)
 
Theoremfundmen 6700 A function is equinumerous to its domain. Exercise 4 of [Suppes] p. 98. (Contributed by NM, 28-Jul-2004.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 15-Nov-2014.)
𝐹 ∈ V       (Fun 𝐹 → dom 𝐹𝐹)
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